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Hope Diamond Presentation

view Hope Diamond Presentation digital asset number 1
Author:
Unknown
Subject:
Switzer, George S
Carmichael, Leonard 1898-1973
Winston, Harry 1896-1978
Winston, Edna (Fleishmann)
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1; Color: Black and white; Size: 8w X 10h; Type of Image: Event; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Date:
November 10, 1958
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
Mrs. Edna Winston presenting the Hope Diamond to Secretary Leonard Carmichael and George Switzer, November 10, 1958.
Summary:
Mrs. Edna Winston, wife of Harry Winston, presenting the Hope Diamond to Secretary Leonard Carmichael and Curator George Switzer on November 10, 1958.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 95, Box 57, Folder: 11
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Hope diamond
Gems
Standard number:
SIA2008-2293
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_11815

Hope Diamond Delivery

view Hope Diamond Delivery digital asset number 1
Author:
Unknown
Subject:
Carmichael, Leonard 1898-1973
Todd, James G
Winston, Edna (Fleishmann)
Winston, Ronald
Summerfield, Arthur E (Arthur Ellsworth) 1899-1972
United States Postal Service
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Division of Mineralogy
National Collections
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1; Color: Black and white; Size: 9.5w x 7.63h; Type of Image: Group, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Date:
November 10, 1958
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Letter carrier James G. Todd presents to Dr. Leonard Carmichael, Smithsonian Secretary, the package containing the Hope Diamond delivered to the Natural History Building. Pictured from left to right are Mr. Ronald Winston, Postmaster General Arthur Summerfield, United States Postal Service letter carrier James G. Todd, Mrs. Edna Winston (wife of Harry Winston) and Dr. Leonard Carmichael.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 95, Box 57, Folder: 11
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Hope diamond
Gifts
Gems
Event
Standard number:
SIA2010-0338 and MP-62A
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_12324

Hope Diamond Presentation

view Hope Diamond Presentation digital asset number 1
Author:
Unknown
Subject:
Switzer, George S
Carmichael, Leonard 1898-1973
Winston, Edna (Fleishmann)
Summerfield, Arthur E (Arthur Ellsworth) 1899-1972
United States Postal Service
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Dept. of Mineral Sciences
National Collections
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1; Color: Black and white; Size: 9.5w x 7.63h; Type of Image: Group, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Date:
November 10, 1958
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
The package containing the Hope Diamond is presented to Smithsonian Secretary Dr. Leonard Carmichael. The donor, Harry Winston, shipped the diamond through the regular United States Postal Service via first-class mail; the postage cost him $2.44, plus $142.85 for $1 million dollars worth of insurance. Pictured from left to right: Postmaster General Arthur Summerfield, Mrs. Edna Winston, Dr. Leonard Carmichael, Dr. George Switzer, and Mr. Sinclair of the National Museum of Natural History's minerology department. Dr. George Switzer was an American mineralogist who is credited with expanding the Smithsonian Institution's famed National Gem and Mineral Collection by acquiring the Hope Diamond for the Museum in 1958. Switzer made the arrangements when renowned New York City jeweler Harry Winston decided to donate the Hope Diamond to the Smithsonian.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 95, Box 57, Folder 11
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Hope diamond
Smithsonian Institution--Employees
Gifts
Gems
Event
Standard number:
SIA2010-0337 and MP-60B
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_12323

The Hope Diamond

view The Hope Diamond digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Channel
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2013-12-10T21:05:55.000Z
Video Title:
The Hope Diamond
Description:
See Tom Cavanagh explain how the Hope Diamond came to the Smithsonian Institution. From: STORIES FROM THE VAULTS: Top Secret http://bit.ly/1rBRuUf
Views:
3,268
Video Duration:
2 min 11 sec
Youtube Category:
Entertainment
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_YyQHid3fh-E

The Hope Diamond

view The Hope Diamond digital asset number 1
Creator:
National Museum of Natural History
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2008-05-02T19:30:57.000Z
Video Title:
The Hope Diamond
Description:
45.52 carats - The Hope Diamond--the world's largest deep blue diamond--is more than a billion years old. It formed deep within the Earth and was carried by a volcanic eruption to the surface in what is now India. Since the Hope Diamond was found in the early 1600s, it has crossed oceans and continents and passed from kings to commoners. It has been stolen and recovered, sold and resold, cut and recut. Through it all, the diamond's value increased. In 1958, Harry Winston donated the Hope Diamond to the Museum, and it now belongs to the people of the United States. Visit the Museum to learn more about the dramatic interactions between people and this diamond, and about its natural history. Visit the Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems, and Minerals. http://www.mnh.si.edu/
Views:
47,698
Video Duration:
57 sec
Topic:
Natural History
Youtube Category:
Science & Technology
See more by:
smithsonianNMNH
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianNMNH
Data Source:
National Museum of Natural History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_4s8PxtExRJE

The Hope Diamond

view The Hope Diamond digital asset number 1
Author:
Unknown
Subject:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Dept. of Mineral Sciences
United States National Museum Division of Mineralogy and Petrology
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 10w x 8h; Type of Image: Object; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Object
Date:
1974
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
Featured in the "Torch," January 1983. There is a color photograph of the gem in Widder, Robert B. A PICTORAL TREASURY OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, 1966, p. 22.
Summary:
The Hope Diamond, the largest of all blue diamonds, 45.52 carats, exhibited at the National Museum of Natural History. The gem is slightly lopsided, possibly because the bottom of the teardrop shape was cut away so that the original stolen jewel could not be identified. The setting is a circlet of smaller white diamonds on a chain of diamonds.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives Record Unit 371 Box 4 Folder January 1983
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Hope diamond
Minerals
United States National Museum
Specimens
Gems
Mineralogy
Standard number:
74-6034
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_8819

Hope Diamond

view Hope Diamond digital asset number 1
Designer:
John Nels Hatleberg
Medium:
Paper (part -1a), resin (part -1b)
Type:
containers
Decorative Arts
Box
Object Name:
Box
Place:
USA
Date:
1995
Catalogue Status:
Research in Progress
Description:
'box of chocolates' ( reads in card catalogue)
Credit Line:
Gift of John Nels Hatleberg
Accession Number:
1996-34-1-a,b
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Product Design and Decorative Arts Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1996-34-1-a_b

Engaged by the Hope Diamond

view Engaged by the Hope Diamond digital asset number 1
Creator:
National Museum of Natural History
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2008-05-09T23:24:16.000Z
Video Title:
Engaged by the Hope Diamond
Description:
45.52 carats - The Hope Diamond--the world's largest deep blue diamond--is more than a billion years old. It formed deep within the Earth and was carried by a volcanic eruption to the surface in what is now India. Since the Hope Diamond was found in the early 1600s, it has crossed oceans and continents and passed from kings to commoners. It has been stolen and recovered, sold and resold, cut and recut. Through it all, the diamond's value increased. In 1958, Harry Winston donated the Hope Diamond to the Museum, and it now belongs to the people of the United States. Visit the Museum to learn more about the dramatic interactions between people and this diamond, and about its natural history. Visit the Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems, and Minerals.
Views:
2,858
Video Duration:
3 min 45 sec
Topic:
Natural History
Youtube Category:
People & Blogs
See more by:
smithsonianNMNH
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianNMNH
Data Source:
National Museum of Natural History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_8dBk0gEQQrU

Hope Diamond Wrapper

view Hope Diamond Wrapper digital asset number 1
Medium:
paper; ink
Dimensions:
Height x Width: 11 1/8 x 14 1/4 in. (28.26 x 36.2 cm)
Type:
Covers & Associated Letters
Place:
United States of America
Date:
November 8, 1958
Description:
The mailing wrapper, marked "please deliver 11:45 AM 11/10/58," contained the rare gem, the "Hope Diamond," when it was sent as a gift by Harry Winston to the Smithsonian Institution located in Washington, D.C. in 1958. Winston, a well-known jeweler, routinely used the mails to deliver valuable material.
Mailed on the morning of November 8 from New York City, the item was sent by registered (first class) mail -- considered the safest means of transport for valuables at that time. The total fee was $145.29 (see the meter machine tapes). Postage only amounted to $2.44 for the package which weighed 61 ounces. The remainder of the fee ($142.85) paid for an indemnity of about $1 million.
The package was delivered on Monday, November 11, by letter carrier James G. Todd, who had picked it up at the Old City Post Office (the building is now home to the National Postal Museum).
Object number:
1992.2002.15
See more items in:
National Postal Museum Collection
On View:
Currently on exhibit at the National Postal Museum
Data Source:
National Postal Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npm_1992.2002.15
Additional Online Media:

David L. Wolper and the Hope Diamond

view David L. Wolper and the Hope Diamond digital asset number 1
Author:
Hofmeister, Richard K
Subject:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Dept. of Mineral Sciences
Hall of Gems
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 10w x 8h; Type of Image: Person, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Person, candid
Date:
1974
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Notes:
Featured in the "Torch," April 1974
Summary:
David L. Wolper, producer of a Smithsonian Institution television special, standing next to the vault in the National Museum of Natural History which displays the Hope Diamond, on March 19, 1974.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 371, Box 2, Folder: April 1974
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Wolper, David L
Hope diamond
Gems
Mineralogy
Vaults (Strong rooms)
Standard number:
74-2646-20A or SIA74-2646-20A
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_8366

Mystery of the Hope Diamond: Sneak Peek

view Mystery of the Hope Diamond: Sneak Peek digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Channel
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2010-11-01T16:28:11.000Z
Video Title:
Mystery of the Hope Diamond: Sneak Peek
Description:
Witness the brilliant history, science and secrets of the Hope Diamond. Relive Hope's epic journey, spanning eons, crossing three continents, and passing from kings to thieves to millionaires and into the halls of the Smithsonian. From the Show: Mystery of the Hope Diamond http://bit.ly/2yamaXd
Views:
17,305
Video Duration:
1 min 26 sec
Youtube Category:
Entertainment
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_8oboqR2UXYw

The Hope Diamond's New Setting Revealed

view The Hope Diamond's New Setting Revealed digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Channel
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2013-05-09T19:55:05.000Z
Video Title:
The Hope Diamond's New Setting Revealed
Description:
For a limited time, the Hope Diamond will be on display in a temporary new setting designed by Harry Winston. See the dazzling new setting revealed inside the halls of Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. From: MYSTERY OF THE HOPE DIAMOND http://bit.ly/1kQO8bR
Views:
18,746
Video Duration:
1 min 6 sec
Youtube Category:
Entertainment
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_HW2Us7p1aSU

Mystery of the Hope Diamond: Behind the Scenes

view Mystery of the Hope Diamond: Behind the Scenes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Channel
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2013-05-09T19:17:06.000Z
Video Title:
Mystery of the Hope Diamond: Behind the Scenes
Description:
Our film crew recreates the glamorous life of socialite Evalyn Walsh McLean. The one-time owner of the hope Diamond was rumored to occasionally display the Hope Diamond on the neck of her Great Dane. From: MYSTERY OF THE HOPE DIAMOND http://bit.ly/1jTQ1t4
Views:
5,563
Video Duration:
1 min 36 sec
Youtube Category:
Entertainment
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_4M9cDlH70sA

Inside the Smithsonian Channel Documentary about the Hope Diamond

view Inside the Smithsonian Channel Documentary about the Hope Diamond digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2011-06-23T19:18:46.000Z
Video Title:
Inside the Smithsonian Channel Documentary about the Hope Diamond
Description:
David Royle and Charles Poe are vice presidents of Smithsonian Networks. They introduce and present a short piece about an upcoming feature about the Hope Diamond. [Catalog No. - CFV10271; Copyright - 2010 Smithsonian Institution]
Views:
4,166
Video Duration:
5 min 49 sec
Topic:
Cultural property
Youtube Category:
Education
See more by:
smithsonianfolklife
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianfolklife
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_WRgO0RH53rI

Dr. George Switzer with Hope Diamond

view Dr. George Switzer with Hope Diamond digital asset number 1
Creator:
Unknown
Subject:
Switzer, George S (George Shirley) 1915-2008
Museum of Natural History (U.S.)
Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Department of Mineral Sciences
Smithsonian Institution Office of Public Affairs
Physical description:
35mm;
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
1968
May 21, 1968
Notes:
See also number 65716
Digital contact sheet available.
Summary:
Dr. George Switzer, Chairman of the Department of Mineral Sciences at Museum of Natural History, with Hope Diamond.
Cite as:
SIA Acc. 11-008 - Smithsonian Institution. Office of Public Affairs, Photographic Collection, 1960-1970, Smithsonian Institution Archives
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-008 [OPA-1266]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_372263

A New Chapter in the Hope Diamond’s History

view A New Chapter in the Hope Diamond’s History digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 18 Aug 2009 03:00:00 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Articles
Arts & Culture
Art & Artists
Description:

The Hope Diamond is the crown jewel of the National Museum of Natural History's internationally recognized, 10,000-strong gems collection. Ever since its arrival at the Smithsonian in 1958, visitors have flocked to see the fabled 45.52-carat brilliant blue beauty.

Today marks a new chapter in the history of the famous diamond. The New York-based jeweler Harry Winston, the firm that donated the Hope to the museum, has drafted three new modern settings for the stone. All three designs, exquisitely rendered by two of the firm's top designers, illustrate the Hope enshrined in baguette diamonds.

The decision to reset the diamond came on the heels of the 50th anniversary of Harry Winston's donation. "As we were thinking about the anniversary, we came up with a theme of giving the public a chance to see the diamond in a way they've never seen it before," says Jeffrey Post, curator of gems at the National Museum of Natural History. "How often do you have a 50th? We needed to have a celebration." The celebration, they decided, would be to display the Hope in a new way.

The challenge, then, was to create a modern design that improved the way the diamond looked. To give the Hope an updated look for its golden anniversary, the team at Harry Winston started with dozens of preliminary sketches, and eventually winnowed them down to three finalists: Renewed Hope, A Journey of Hope and Embracing Hope.

The designs, says Sandrine de Laage, vice president of design at Harry Winston, create a "very interesting contrast between the deep blue of the diamond, the brilliance of the diamond and the cooler aspects of the baguette diamonds."

Image by Harry Winston. Rie Yatsuki (left), Sandrine de Laage (middle) and Maurice Galli (right) look through preliminary sketches for the new setting of the Hope Diamond. The final three will be voted on through September 7. (original image)

Image by Harry Winston. Maurice Galli, a senior designer, has worked at Harry Winston for almost 20 years. He is the only designer to have worked with Harry Winston himself. (original image)

Image by Harry Winston. Rie Yatsuki, originally trained as a gemologist, met Galli at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City and began working at Harry Winston six years ago. (original image)

Image by Harry Winston. This design, “Renewed Hope,” by Rie Yatsuki was inspired by a waterfall. The cascading diamonds give the feeling of flowing water. (original image)

Image by Harry Winston. The first of Maurice Galli’s designs, “A Journey of Hope” is meant to evoke the American experience where the Hope Diamond serves as the connecting point in a crossroads. (original image)

Image by Harry Winston. “Embracing Hope” uses strands of baguette diamonds to literally hug the Hope Diamond at the center. (original image)

Image by NMNH, SI. The diamond’s current setting, once described by Evalyn Walsh McLean as a “frame of diamonds,” was originally created by Pierre Cartier and has remained largely unchanged since the early 1900s. (original image)

Trained in France and born to a family of jewelry designers, Maurice Galli has worked for the firm for nearly two decades and is the only designer to have worked with Harry Winston, who died in 1978.

Galli says his first design, A Journey of Hope, symbolizes the American experience. In it, the stone asymmetrically joins strands of baguettes. Galli calls it a crossroad, "uniting hope and opportunity."

In Galli's second design, Embracing Hope, a ribbon of three rows of baguette diamonds hugs the Hope Diamond at the center. "The idea there was to create the very strong contrast between the brilliance, the life of the Hope itself and the look of the baguettes," he says.

Designer Rie Yatsuki created the third design, Renewed Hope, in which dangling diamonds recall the flow of water in nature, Yatsuki says. "I wanted to give a lot of brilliance to the Hope Diamond to enhance the beauty and the energy," she adds.

The museum announced today that just one of the three Harry Winston settings will be crafted. The Hope will be temporarily housed in the new setting and put on display this spring for a limited time, after which the setting will return to Harry Winston.

But which setting will be chosen? In an unusual move, museum officials say, the selection will be decided by the public, in a first-ever popular vote.

Between now and September 7, visitors will vote for one of the three designs through an online poll, hosted by the Smithsonian Channel, whose new documentary "Mystery of the Hope Diamond" is in production and due out next spring.

Alas, the new setting, unlike the diamond, isn't forever. After a limited-time, the diamond will be returned to its original, historic setting. Even the team at Harry Winston can't argue with that logic. "I think the setting is part of the heritage, it's part of what the Hope diamond is today," de Laage says.

The Hope Diamond wasn't known by that name until the 1830s, relatively late in the diamond's long history, when it was owned by the Hope family in London. The stone's journey began in India more than 300 years ago, when it was purchased by a French merchant. For generations, the stone traveled from France to London to New York and back again and then in 1910 it came to Washington, D.C., where the diamond's so-called curse evolved. It began as a tall tale that jeweler Pierre Cartier concocted to entice the interest of the wealthy and prestigious Evalyn Walsh McLean. She purchased the stone in 1912. Harry Winston bought the stone in 1949, two years after Evalyn's death, and the rest is history.

Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_02fd309a31c4460d30366ebfef136b58

Don’t You Wish You Could Wear the Hope Diamond?

view Don’t You Wish You Could Wear the Hope Diamond? digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 17 May 2011 12:00:48 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Articles
At the Smithsonian
At the Smithsonian
Blogs
Around the Mall
Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_3f21d2be8d2176e51ef77ab87f5b5af8

See the Hope Diamond in its New Setting, Unveiled Today at Natural History

view See the Hope Diamond in its New Setting, Unveiled Today at Natural History digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 18 Nov 2010 21:07:11 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Articles
At the Smithsonian
At the Smithsonian
Blogs
Around the Mall
Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_a2515aab83de3686876a4c70ee5684e2

The Polls Are Open. Vote for Your Favorite Hope Diamond Setting

view The Polls Are Open. Vote for Your Favorite Hope Diamond Setting digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 25 Aug 2009 14:29:23 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Articles
At the Smithsonian
At the Smithsonian
Blogs
Around the Mall
Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_75a8d5e209d6bc9323cbf9495ffaa674

How Much the Hope Diamond is Worth and Other Questions From Our Readers

view How Much the Hope Diamond is Worth and Other Questions From Our Readers digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 07 Feb 2012 16:46:25 +0000
Blog Post Category:
At the Smithsonian
At the Smithsonian
Blogs
Around the Mall
Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_9f532736a12333139deb3c67be204f27

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