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1953 Glasspar sports car

view 1953 Glasspar sports car digital asset: 1953 Glasspar sports car
Maker:
Glasspar Company
Measurements:
overall: 4 ft x 5 9/16 ft x 14 ft; 1.2192 m x 1.7017 m x 4.2672 m
Object Name:
automobile
Date made:
1953
Description:
This 1953 Glasspar is an example of fiberglass-body sports cars made in small quantities after World War II. Some American motorists, particularly veterans returning from overseas duty, wanted European-style sports cars. Several American companies began small-scale production of sports cars with molded fiberglass bodies. This type of body could be made in small quantities without the expensive tooling, dies, and presses needed to make steel bodies. William Tritt, a California fiberglass-boat builder, introduced the Jaguar-like Glasspar in 1951 and sold several hundred bodies. The Glasspar body fit on a used automobile chassis that the owner obtained and customized by shortening the wheelbase. A fiberglass body was not only simpler to make; it was lightweight, rustproof, dent-resistant, and easy to repair. And it was inexpensive; a Glasspar body sold for only $950, one-fourth the price of a Jaguar and less than half the price of a Ford convertible. Tritt improved the technique of making fiberglass bodies and made more bodies of this type than his competitors. He understood the importance of casting an automobile body in one piece, and he developed techniques to avoid shrinkage, tearing at metal joints, and mismatched parts. Dale L. Dutton, a Glasspar enthusiast, donated this car to the Smithsonian in 1996.
Major auto manufacturers dismissed plastic bodies following an unsuccessful Ford experiment in the early 1940s, but William Tritt demonstrated that a body made of polyester resin and glass strands was practical, economical to produce, and superior to steel in many ways. Tritt introduced the Glasspar in 1951 and made about 300 sports car bodies by hand over a period of several years. Despite its advantages, the plastic car seemed destined to remain a low-volume vehicle because of slow production and limited capital investment; only one Glasspar body was made per day. But in 1953, General Motors decided to make Corvette bodies of fiberglass and consulted with Tritt
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Gift of Dale L. Dutton
ID Number:
1996.0401.01
Accession number:
1996.0401
Catalog number:
1996.0401.01
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Automobiles
Transportation
Road Transportation
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_743173

33c Extreme Sports single

Title: Scott Catalogue USA 3191d
view 33c Extreme Sports single digital asset number 1
Printer:
Ashton-Potter USA (Ltd)
Medium:
paper; ink (multicolor); adhesive
Dimensions:
3 x 3 cm (1 3/16 x 1 3/16 in.)
Type:
Postage Stamps
Place:
United States of America
Date:
May 2, 2000
Description:
CELEBRATE THE CENTURY
1990s
Extreme sports
33-cent mint single
Issued May 2, 2000
Topic:
Sports
Credit line:
Copyright United States Postal Service. All rights reserved.
Object number:
2000.2020.271
See more items in:
National Postal Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Postal Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npm_2000.2020.271

Sports

view Sports digital asset: Sports
Collection Creator:
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969
Container:
Box 30, Folder 16
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1930s-1950s
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original papers requires an appointment. Access to audiovisual recording with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Ben Shahn papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Ben Shahn papers, 1879-1990, bulk 1933-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Ben Shahn papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-shahben-ref1411

[Sports]

view [Sports] digital asset: [Sports]
Collection Creator:
Curry, John Steuart, 1897-1946
Extent:
(See also OV 11)
Container:
Box 4, Folder 17
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1918-1932
Collection Restrictions:
The bulk of the collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Access to undigitized portions requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The John Steuart Curry papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Steuart Curry and Curry family papers, 1900-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Steuart Curry and Curry family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-currjohn-ref280

The Negro In Sports

view <I>The Negro In Sports</I> digital asset number 1
Written by:
Edwin Bancroft Henderson, American, 1883 - 1977
Published by:
The Associated Publishers, Inc., American, 1921 - 2005
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 8 × 6 × 7/8 in. (20.3 × 15.2 × 2.2 cm)
Type:
hardcover books
Place made:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1939
Description:
The Negro In Sports by Edwin Bancroft Henderson. This book has a yellow jacket with black type and black photographs of various African American sports athletes. The title centered at the top of the cover reads, [THE NEGRO IN SPORTS / EDWIN BANCROFT HENDERSON]. The book jacket's spine reads, [THE NEGRO / IN SPORTS / HENDERSON / $2.00 / NET / ASSOCIATED / PUBLISHERS]. The back cover of the jacket features several more photographs of various African American athletes. The words [W Falconer / Captain CEC USNR / 1943] are handwritten on the inside of the book.
Topic:
African American
Sports
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2015.3
Rights:
Unknown - Restrictions Possible
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Exhibition:
Sports: Leveling the Playing Field
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Community/Third Floor, 3 052
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2015.3
Additional Online Media:

Corvette ZR-1 racing sports car, 1990

view Corvette ZR-1 racing sports car, 1990 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Morrison Motorsports, Inc.
Measurements:
overall: 4 7/16 ft x 5 15/16 ft x 14 13/16 ft; 1.346 m x 1.8032 m x 4.5211 m
Object Name:
automobile, racing
Place made:
United States: Georgia, Albany
Date made:
1990
Description:
Few private owners, and only extremely wealthy ones, campaigned cars in the top sports car races in Europe. As a result of the European influences toward more specialized engineering for the best sports cars, the "prototype" racing classes emerged in the US for the fastest, most powerful US and European-built sports cars - none of which were street legal by any stretch.
In this context, professional sports car racing became more popular by the 1970s. Later, organizations such as the International Motor Sports Association (IMSA) organized professional races for prototype sports cars and high-powered "GT" sports coupes.
The Corvette ZR-1 No. 92 was built specially by Tommy Morrison Motorsports in 1990 for racing in the IMSA "GTO" class. General Motors provided backing and technical services; the major financial sponsors were Mobil Oil and EDS. The car is one of several built "from the ground up" as race cars. The tubular space frame resembles that of a modern NASCAR racer; the body follows the Corvette ZR-1's lines exactly but was designed to fit the custom-built frame. The modified Chevrolet V-8 engine was developed by the Mercruiser Corp. The all-independent suspension is that of a production ZR-1 Corvette, with special springing and shock absorbers for racing.
No. 92 placed 4th in class in the 1991 Daytona 24-hour endurance race, on Daytona's "road course" that uses multiple corners on the big track's infield combined with part of the high banking used by NASCAR racers. The 92 also placed 6th in class in the 1991 Sebring 12-hour endurance race, held at the historic sports car track in Sebring, FL, that still uses a portion of a World War II-era concrete airfield in its circuitous course. Even finishing these endurance races is an accomplishment, and 4th and 6th places, out of the large fields of competing cars, are regarded as highly successful.
Another of Morrison's ZR-1's set the world speed record for a 24-hour run, averaging some 174 mph.
Sports-car racing was a post-World War II phenomenon in the US. While racing by stock cars, sprint cars, and dragsters attracted fans of generally middle-class and more modest means, sports-car racing attracted young car-owners and fans primarily of wealthier means. This relationship stemmed from the pronounced cachet that went with European automotive engineering from the late 1930s through the 1960s.
Ex-servicemen who had been based in England began bringing British sports cars to American soil in 1948. Auto dealerships selling such makes as MG, Triumph, and Jaguar - and Porsche from Germany and Alfa-Romeo from Italy - opened in the US for the first time. These cars were typical of European engineering for two-door performance cars: light, agile, many with small or medium-sized engines compared to general US custom, and right at home on curving, twisting roads where a driver could test his or her cornering skill. Many sports cars were relatively small (by American passenger-car standards) two-door convertibles, and a few were low-slung, two-door coupes. Organized racing for sports cars sprang up immediately. Since no oval track could bring out the qualities of sports-car agility, local organizers often marked out multi-cornered courses with rubber cones and hay bales on the abundant pavements of abandoned military airfields. Organized races through city streets were sometimes approved by local officials.
Soon enough, paved race tracks—with hilly, twisting layouts emulating courses in continental Europe for "Formula" and sports cars—began appearing in the US. And variations on sports-car racing also quickly took root: endurance races (of two, six, 12, and 24 hours), together with numerous classes (so that less-powerful MGs and Triumphs, for example, could race in different classes than, say, Jaguars, Ferraris, or Maserattis). And "autocrossing" was organized locally in towns all over the US—wherein one car at a time competed for the shortest elapsed time over short, twisting courses often marked off temporarily on large, open macadam parking lots.
Before long, America got its first sports car: the Chevrolet Corvette, introduced tentatively in 1953. By the late 1950s, a re-engineered Corvette took its place as a competitive sports car, both in the showrooms and on sport-car race tracks.
The Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) organized sports car races in the US and also licensed amateur drivers, after an on-track skills test with a well-experienced driver. Regional championships were competed-for in many classes, including hand-built sports cars intended only for the track. Through about 1960, a top amateur competitor could file an entry and drive his production sports car to a sports car race, tape-up the headlights (to keep broken glass from flying too far in an incident), remove a few excess parts such as mufflers and bumpers, paint-on an assigned race number to the car temporarily, and go racing. By the early 1960s, such a cavalier approach became passé, and serious sports-car racers prepared their cars as fully as stock-car and sprint-car owners. The SCCA responded to the change by loosening the design rules for its "production" classes to include a variety of engine and other performance modifications - although the car still had to be "street legal," meaning it still had to comply, off the track, with passenger vehicle licensing requirements for use on public roads. The SCCA "modified" classes became more so, including exotic cars intended only for the most serious racing.
Europeans, meanwhile, developed sports car racing after World War II to a level of sophistication in cars and organization of races almost equal to that of Formula 1 "Grand Prix" racing. And in both types of racing, factory teams were by far the majority of participants.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Engineering
Credit Line:
Gift of Morrison Motorsports, Inc.
ID Number:
1997.0120.01
Accession number:
1997.0120
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Transportation
Road Transportation
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1299489

Ken Anderson 2011 Iditarod sports card

view Ken Anderson 2011 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Ken Anderson trading card
Depicted:
Anderson, Ken
Physical Description:
plastic (overall material)
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2011
Description (Brief):
2011 Iditarod sports card of musher Ken Anderson and two of his sled dogs, sponsored by the United States Coast Guard. The Coast Guard sponsored Anderson’s Iditarod runs from 2011 through 2013. Ken Anderson began mushing at age 3 in his native Minnesota. He moved to Alaska in 1993 to attend the University of Alaska and began running the Iditarod in 1999. He owns and operates Windy Creek Kennels with his wife, Gwen, also an Iditarod musher and they compete in sprint and marathon races in the lower ‘48’ and Europe. The Andersons are the first husband and wife to race in the Iditarod and the Yukon Quest.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3023.02
Nonaccession number:
2013.3023
Catalog number:
2013.3023.02
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1448055

Ken Anderson 2011 Iditarod sports card

view Ken Anderson 2011 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Ken Anderson trading card
Depicted:
Anderson, Ken
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2011
Description (Brief):
2011 Iditarod sports card of musher Ken Anderson and his sled dog team on the trail, sponsored by the United States Coast Guard. The Coast Guard sponsored Anderson’s Iditarod runs from 2011 through 2013. Ken Anderson began mushing at age 3 in his native Minnesota. He moved to Alaska in 1993 to attend the University of Alaska and began running the Iditarod in 1999. He owns and operates Windy Creek Kennels with his wife, Gwen, also an Iditarod musher and they compete in sprint and marathon races in the lower ‘48’ and Europe. The Andersons are the first husband and wife to race in the Iditarod and the Yukon Quest.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3023.04
Nonaccession number:
2013.3023
Catalog number:
2013.3023.04
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1448061

Lead Dog "Badger" 2012 Iditarod sports card

view Lead Dog "Badger" 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Happy Trails Kennel trading card
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of lead dog, Badger, sponsored by Happy Trails Kennel which is owned and operated by musher, Martin Buser. Buser emigrated to Alaska from Switzerland in 1979 and opened his sled dog breeding and training facility, the Happy Trails Kennel. Buser chooses dogs from sprint racing champions and breeds them with dogs that are athletically well built and then trains them for long distance races such as the Iditarod. He had many skeptics in the beginning but has run in every Iditarod since 1986, winning four times so he must be doing something right. Buser has won the Leonhard Seppala Award for the most humanitarian care of his dogs in 1988, 1993, 1995, 1997, and 2014.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.29
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.29
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447950
Additional Online Media:

Bill Mackey 1991 Iditarod sports card

view Bill Mackey 1991 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Iditarod Trading card
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
1991
Description (Brief):
1991 Iditarod sports card autographed by musher Bill Mackey of Mackey's Mushing School. Bill Mackey ran the 1984 Iditarod Sled Dog Race as a rookie and received the Red Lantern Award. This award is given to the last finisher of the race and began as a joke during the 1953 Fur Rendezvous Race and carried over to the Iditarod. It is often mistaken for the Widow’s Lamp which is a kerosene lantern, lit and hung on the burled arch in Nome until the last racer crosses the finish line. It is then extinguished. This is to commemorate the tradition started during the early days of Alaskan history when sled dog teams were used to carry mail and supplies to the early settlers of Alaska. A lamp was lit and hung by the door of a roadhouse to help the mushers find their way and to let people know that there was still a team out on the trail. Once the last musher arrived the lamp was brought inside.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.10
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.10
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447931
Additional Online Media:

Lead Dog "Alfred" 2012 Iditarod sports card

view Lead Dog "Alfred" 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Happy Trails Kennel trading card
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of lead dog, Alfred, sponsored by Happy Trails Kennel which is owned and operated by musher, Martin Buser. Buser emigrated to Alaska from Switzerland in 1979 and opened his sled dog breeding and training facility, the Happy Trails Kennel. Buser chooses dogs from sprint racing champions and breeds them with dogs that are athletically well built and then trains them for long distance races such as the Iditarod. He had many skeptics in the beginning but has run in every Iditarod since 1986, winning four times so he must be doing something right. Buser has won the Leonhard Seppala Award for the most humanitarian care of his dogs in 1988, 1993, 1995, 1997, and 2014.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.20
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.20
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447941
Additional Online Media:

Lead Dog "Goose" 2012 Iditarod sports card

view Lead Dog "Goose" 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Happy Trails Kennel trading card
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of lead dog, Goose, sponsored by Happy Trails Kennel which is owned and operated by musher, Martin Buser. Buser emigrated to Alaska from Switzerland in 1979 and opened his sled dog breeding and training facility, the Happy Trails Kennel. Buser chooses dogs from sprint racing champions and breeds them with dogs that are athletically well built and then trains them for long distance races such as the Iditarod. He had many skeptics in the beginning but has run in every Iditarod since 1986, winning four times so he must be doing something right. Buser has won the Leonhard Seppala Award for the most humanitarian care of his dogs in 1988, 1993, 1995, 1997, and 2014.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.28
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.28
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447949
Additional Online Media:

Lead Dog "Angel" 2012 Iditarod sports card

view Lead Dog "Angel" 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Happy Trails Kennel trading card
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of lead dog, Angel, sponsored by Happy Trails Kennel which is owned and operated by musher, Martin Buser. Buser emigrated to Alaska from Switzerland in 1979 and opened his sled dog breeding and training facility, the Happy Trails Kennel. Buser chooses dogs from sprint racing champions and breeds them with dogs that are athletically well built and then trains them for long distance races such as the Iditarod. He had many skeptics in the beginning but has run in every Iditarod since 1986, winning four times so he must be doing something right. Buser has won the Leonhard Seppala Award for the most humanitarian care of his dogs in 1988, 1993, 1995, 1997, and 2014.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.24
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.24
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447945
Additional Online Media:

Single Leader "Lionel" 2012 Iditarod sports card

view Single Leader "Lionel" 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Happy Trails Kennel trading card
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of single leader dog, Lionel, sponsored by Happy Trails Kennel which is owned and operated by musher, Martin Buser. Buser emigrated to Alaska from Switzerland in 1979 and opened his sled dog breeding and training facility, the Happy Trails Kennel. Buser chooses dogs from sprint racing champions and breeds them with dogs that are athletically well built and then trains them for long distance races such as the Iditarod. He had many skeptics in the beginning but has run in every Iditarod since 1986, winning four times so he must be doing something right. Buser has won the Leonhard Seppala Award for the most humanitarian care of his dogs in 1988, 1993, 1995, 1997, and 2014.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.25
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.25
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447946
Additional Online Media:

Apprentice Leader "Pele" 2012 Iditarod sports card

view Apprentice Leader "Pele" 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Happy Trails Kennel trading card
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of apprentice lead dog, Pele, sponsored by Happy Trails Kennel which is owned and operated by musher, Martin Buser. Buser emigrated to Alaska from Switzerland in 1979 and opened his sled dog breeding and training facility, the Happy Trails Kennel. Buser chooses dogs from sprint racing champions and breeds them with dogs that are athletically well built and then trains them for long distance races such as the Iditarod. He had many skeptics in the beginning but has run in every Iditarod since 1986, winning four times so he must be doing something right. Buser has won the Leonhard Seppala Award for the most humanitarian care of his dogs in 1988, 1993, 1995, 1997, and 2014.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.27
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.27
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447948
Additional Online Media:

Speed Leader "Rachel" 2012 Iditarod sports card

view Speed Leader "Rachel" 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Happy Trails Kennel trading card
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of the speed lead dog, Rachel, sponsored by Happy Trails Kennel which is owned and operated by musher, Martin Buser. Buser emigrated to Alaska from Switzerland in 1979 and opened his sled dog breeding and training facility, the Happy Trails Kennel. Buser chooses dogs from sprint racing champions and breeds them with dogs that are athletically well built and then trains them for long distance races such as the Iditarod. He had many skeptics in the beginning but has run in every Iditarod since 1986, winning four times so he must be doing something right. Buser has won the Leonhard Seppala Award for the most humanitarian care of his dogs in 1988, 1993, 1995, 1997, and 2014.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.22
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.22
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447943
Additional Online Media:

Martin Buser 2012 Iditarod sports card

view Martin Buser 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Happy Trails Kennel trading card
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of champion musher Martin Buser, sponsored by Happy Trails Kennel which is owned and operated by musher, Martin Buser. Buser emigrated to Alaska from Switzerland in 1979 and opened his sled dog breeding and training facility, the Happy Trails Kennel. Buser chooses dogs from sprint racing champions and breeds them with dogs that are athletically well built and then trains them for long distance races such as the Iditarod. He had many skeptics in the beginning but has run in every Iditarod since 1986, winning four times so he must be doing something right. Buser has won the Leonhard Seppala Award for the most humanitarian care of his dogs in 1988, 1993, 1995, 1997, and 2014.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.23
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.23
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447944
Additional Online Media:

Ken Anderson 2011 Iditarod sports card

view Ken Anderson 2011 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Ken Anderson trading card
Depicted:
Anderson, Ken
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2011
Description (Brief):
2011 Iditarod sports card of musher Ken Anderson and his sled dog team on the trail, sponsored by the United States Coast Guard. The Coast Guard sponsored Anderson’s Iditarod runs from 2011 through 2013. Ken Anderson began mushing at age 3 in his native Minnesota. He moved to Alaska in 1993 to attend the University of Alaska and began running the Iditarod in 1999. He owns and operates Windy Creek Kennels with his wife, Gwen, also an Iditarod musher and they compete in sprint and marathon races in the lower ‘48’ and Europe. The Andersons are the first husband and wife to race in the Iditarod and the Yukon Quest.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3023.03
Nonaccession number:
2013.3023
Catalog number:
2013.3023.03
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1448057

DeeDee Jonrowe 2012 Iditarod sports card

view DeeDee Jonrowe 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Dee Dee Jonrowe trading card
Depicted:
Jonrowe, DeeDee
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of musher DeeDee Jonrowe and one of her sled dogs at the ceremonial start of the Iditarod sponsored by the Shell Oil Company. DeeDee Jonrowe moved to Alaska in her teens and began competing in sled dog races in 1978. She ran her first Iditarod in 1980 and consistently finishes in the top 10 or 20 and winning both the Copper Basin 300 and Klondike 300 races. She is most proud of the awards she has won for dog care including the Leonhard Seppala Humanitarian award given by the veterinarians of the Iditarod for the musher who has provided the best care and treatment to their dogs. She is the founder of M.U.S.H. with Pride, an organization that assists with training of kennel owners on the fair treatment of dogs. Her public battle with breast cancer in 2002 has cast Jonrowe as the inspirational role model for many and in 2003 she became an honorary chairperson for the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life. Jonrowe lost her home and kennel in 2015 during the Sockey Wildfire but managed to save all of her dogs and is currently rebuilding.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.18
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.18
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447939
Additional Online Media:

DeeDee Jonrowe 2012 Iditarod sports card

view DeeDee Jonrowe 2012 Iditarod sports card digital asset: Dee Dee Jonrowe trading card
Depicted:
Jonrowe, DeeDee
Physical Description:
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
Object Name:
sports card, sled dog racing
Date made:
2012
Description (Brief):
2012 Iditarod sports card of musher DeeDee Jonrowe and one of her sled dogs sponsored by the Shell Oil Company. DeeDee Jonrowe moved to Alaska in her teens and began competing in sled dog races in 1978. She ran her first Iditarod in 1980 and consistently finishes in the top 10 or 20 and winning both the Copper Basin 300 and Klondike 300 races. She is most proud of the awards she has won for dog care including the Leonhard Seppala Humanitarian award given by the veterinarians of the Iditarod for the musher who has provided the best care and treatment to their dogs. She is the founder of M.U.S.H. with Pride, an organization that assists with training of kennel owners on the fair treatment of dogs. Her public battle with breast cancer in 2002 has cast Jonrowe as the inspirational role model for many and in 2003 she became an honorary chairperson for the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life. Jonrowe lost her home and kennel in 2015 during the Sockey Wildfire but managed to save all of her dogs and is currently rebuilding.
The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is an extreme sports challenge that tests the skill and endurance of competitors while celebrating Alaska’s sled dog culture and history. Teams of 12 to 16 dogs, primarily Alaskan Huskies, and their musher experience harsh terrain and weather conditions during the 1,150 mile run from Anchorage to Nome. In its modern iteration as an extreme sport, the Iditarod takes an intense physical toll not only on the human competitors but also on the sled dogs. The race follows a large network of Native trade and travel routes which travelers used when gold was discovered in the isolated town of Iditarod. This discovery led to a “rush” of miners and settlers from across the country, transforming the trail into the region’s main mail and supply route. The area’s harsh winter conditions made sled dog teams the main source of transportation along the Iditarod Trail and it is this rich history which the Iditarod race celebrates today. In 1978 Congress designated the 2300 mile Iditarod Trail as a National Historic Trail recognizing its importance in the shaping of America. Through its beginnings as a regional story, the Iditarod provides us the opportunity to explore the American Experience through the origins of the Iditarod National Historic Trail and the transformation of the Alaskan sled dog culture into an international sport. The Iditarod is now the largest and most prominent sled dog race in the world, attracting international competitors and world-wide media attention.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Dog Sled racing
Sports
Professional
Related event:
Iditarod Sled Dog Race
ID Number:
2013.3036.11
Nonaccession number:
2013.3036
Catalog number:
2013.3036.11
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Sport and Leisure
Sled Dog Racing
Sports & Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1447932
Additional Online Media:

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