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Edward Harvey Davis Photograph Collection, 1903-1939

Creator:
Davis, Edward H. b. 1862
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
ca. 2000 Negatives
ca. 770 b&w Photographic prints
Culture:
Akimel O'odham
Apache Indians
Cahuilla Indians
Chemehuevi Indians
Cochimi
Cochiti Indians
Cocopa Indians
Cora Indians
Guaicuruj
Hualapai Indians
Huichol Indians
Kiliwa Indians
Kamia Indians
Luiseño Indians
Maricopa Indians
Mayo Indians
Mohave Indians
Opata Indians
Paipai Indians
Pima Indians
San Carlos Indian Reservation (Ariz.)
Seri Indians
Tohono O'Odham Indians
Ute Indians
Yaqui Indians
Yuma Indians
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Arizona
Basin
California
Southwest
Mexico
Date:
1903
1903-1939
Notes:
Artist, photographer, and artefact collector, Edward Harvey Davis was born on June 18, 1862 in New York. He traveled to California in 1884 for health reasons (Bright's disease i.e. actue of chronic nephritis (a kidney disorder)), arriving in 1885, and settled on 320 acres in an area called Mesa Grande, east of San Diego. Later that year he returned to New York to marry, bringing his new bride, Anna May Wells back to California with him. They would eventually have four children. Shortly after settling in California, Davis became interested in the the Kumeyaay (Northern Diguenos), the Mesa Grande Indians indigenous to that area, and spent the remainder of his life collecting artifacts, studying and photographing them. He collected so many items that his ranch house ran out of room for them, necessitating the building of another structure (adobe) to house them. As a result of this interest and care of the Mesa Grande Indians in San Diego County, in 1907, Davis was named a ceremonial chief by the Indians themselves. Originally trained as an artist, Davis first worked as a drafter and architect. Upon his arrival in San Diego in 1885, he fortuitously invested in and profited from the booming real estate industry of the time. Davis became known to George Gustav Heye when Heye initially purchased a collection of Indian artifacts from him for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1915. With the money from the sale of his collection, Davis was able to open a resort lodge called the Powam that same year. His real estate investments and his lodge enabled Davis to finance his fieldwork, most of which he did on his own. In 1916 however, Davis also became an official field collector for the Museum of the American Indian in New York. Sporadically, from 1917 to 1930, Heye contracted Davis to conduct field trips to California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Mexico, and Tiburon Island, visiting over two dozen different Indian peoples in the course of his travels. Wherever he went, Davis continued to photograph the Native peoples, but did not consider these photographs to be part of his contract with Heye. Heye later purchased the bulk of Davis's photograph collection. Davis also had sketched objects and landscapes during his travels as a method of preserving what he saw. Davis died in San Bernardino on February 22, 1951. In addition to his photographs, Davis authored several scholarly articles.
Summary:
Davis visited the Diegueno and Luiseno in southern California; the Pi-pi (Pais), Kil-e-wah (Cahuilla), and Waicuri of Lower California, Mexico; the Yuma, Cocopah, Pima, Papago, Maricopa, Mojave, Hualapai (Walapai), Yaqui, and White Mountain Apache in Arizona; the Cora, Huichol, Opata, Mayo, and Yaqui of Mexico; the Seri of Tiburon Island; the Chemehuevi of Nevada and California; the Modoc and Klamath Lake Indians in Oregon; and the Paiute in Nevada. His collection contains photographs of Apache, Cahuilla, Chemehuevi, Cochimi, Cochiti Pueblo, Cocopa, Cora, Guaicuruj, Huichol, Kawia, Kiliwa, Kumeyaay (Diegueno), Luiseno, Maricopa, Mayo, Mission, Mohave, Opata, Paipai, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Pima (Akimel O'odham), San Carlos Pueblo, San Manuel, Seri, Ute, Walapai (Hualapai), Yaqui, and Yuma.
Topic:
Indians of Mexico
Indians of North America
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.031
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs, 1898-1900, 1903, 1914

Creator:
Rumsey, Mary Harriman 1881-1934
Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S. 1868-1952
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart) 1855-1942
Harriman, Edward Henry 1848-1909
Averell, William H
Coe, Wesley R (Wesley Roswell) 1869-1960
Cole, Leon J (Leon Jacob) 1877-1948
Devereux, W. B
Gilbert, Grove Karl 1843-1918
Ridgway, Robert 1850-1929
Pillsbury, Arthur C (Arthur Clarence)
Keen, Dora 1871-
Artist:
Schreyvogel, Charles 1861-1912
Subject:
Harriman Alaska Expedition (1899)
Physical description:
277 photographic prints : silver gelatin
9 photographic prints : platinum
396 lantern slides
1 map
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)
Alaskan Eskimo
Apache
Hopi
Pikuni (Piegan)
Suquamish
Tlingit
Unangan (Aleut)
Yakutat Tlingit
Yuit (Siberian Yup'ik)
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Collection descriptions
Place:
Alaska
British Columbia
Siberia (Russia)
Date:
1898
1898-1914
1898-1900, 1903, 1914
Notes:
Mary Harriman Rumsey (1881-1934) was an important American philanthropist and the oldest child of railroad tycoon Edward Henry Harriman. In 1901, while studying at Barnard College, she co-founded the Junior League for the Promotion of Settlement Movements (later named the Junior League of the City of New York), which facilitated charitable work by privileged women among New York's impoverished groups. Rumsey's efforts lead to the establishment of the Association of Junior Leagues International Inc. in 1921. Additionally, Rumsey co-founded Today magazine with her brother Averell Harriman and others, and in 1933 she chaired the Consumer Advisory Board of the National Recovery Administration.
In 1899, Mary Harriman was among the Harriman family members who accompanied the Harriman Alaska Expedition. Originally planned as a bear-hunting trip for the family, the expedition, was funded by Edward Henry Harriman and organized with the help of ethnographer and naturalist Clinton Hart Merriam. The party of accomplished scientists, naturalists, photographers, artists, and writers cruised from British Columbia to Siberia and back on a private ship, the SS George W. Elder, in June and July of 1899. The scientists' findings were published in the thirteen-volume Harriman Alaska Series, and Harriman also paid the expedition's official photographer, Edward S. Curtis, to compile souvenir albums from the over 5,000 photographs made during the course of the expedition.
Summary:
The bulk of the collection comprises photographic prints, lantern slides, and one map documenting the Harriman Alaska Expedition from May to July of 1899. These photographs were made by members of the expedition, most prominently its official photographer Edward S. Curtis, funder Edward Henry Harriman, and lead scientist C. Hart Merriam. They depict Alaskan scenery, members of the expedition, and Native people and settlements that they encountered. Mary Harriman Rumsey's collection also includes later platinum prints of American Indians made and signed by Curtis (1900, 1903), photographs of glaciers in Alaska by Dora Keen (1914), a photograph of a painting by Charles Schreyvogel (1903), and a photograph of White Pass by Arthur Clarence Pillsbury (1898).
Cite as:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Mary Harriman Rumsey Collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition Photographs, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Scientific expeditions
Local number:
NMAI.AC.053
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Bartlett East Greenland Expedition photographs and negatives collection, 1928-1930

Creator:
Bartlett East Greenland Expedition (1930)
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Subject:
Bartlett, Bob 1875-1946
Bartlett East Greenland Expedition (1930)
Physical description:
7 photographic prints
5 negatives : acetate
Culture:
Tunumiit (East Greenland Eskimo) [Ammassalik] (Angmagsalik Eskimo)
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Portraits
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Greenland
Date:
1928
1928-1930
Notes:
For more than 50 years and on more than 40 expeditions, Captain Robert "Bob" Bartlett sailed, explored, and mapped the Arctic. During the Great Depression, in order to finance his cruises, Bartlett frequently collaborated with scientific institutions, including with the Museum of the American Indian for the 1930 Bartlett East Greenland Expedition. Led by Bartlett and financed by Museum trustee James B. Ford (1844-1928) for the Museum, the expedition allowed anthropologist Junius Bird (1907-1982) to conduct archaeological excavations of Eskimo ruins on Shannon Island and Clavering Island. Co-authored by Bartlett and Bird, "The Bartlett East Greenland Expedition" appeared in the July 1931 issue of Geographical review.
Summary:
The Bartlett East Greenland Expedition collection consists of photographs and negatives directly and indirectly related to the 1930 expedition. Included are several studio portraits of Captain Bob Bartlett, leader of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation-sponsored expedition, and a depiction of him trading with Tunumiit (Ammassalimiut Eskimo) men during the 1930 expedition. There are several views of Tunumiit men in kayaks, both pulling up to and fishing near the expedition schooner. The photographer is unknown. The collection also contains a World Wide Photo Co. negative and print from it of Bartlett's schooner, the Effie M. Morrissey.
Cite as:
Bartlett East Greenland Expedition photographs and negatives collection, 1928-1930, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Topic:
Ammassalimiut Eskimos--Fishing
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.005
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

S. K. Lothrop collection of negatives, photographs and lantern slides, 1915-1928

Creator:
Lothrop, S. K (Samuel Kirkland) 1892-1965
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
18 lantern slides
1144 negatives : acetate
3 photographic prints
Culture:
Tz'utuhil Maya (Tzutuhil/Zutigil)
Quiché Maya (Quiche)
Kaqchikel Maya (Cakchiquel)
Maya (archaeological culture)
Yámana (Yagán/Yahgan)
Selk'nam (Ona)
A:shiwi (Zuni)
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Lantern slides
Photographic prints
Place:
Guatemala
El Salvador
Argentina
South America
Central America
Zuni (N.M.)
Date:
1915
1915-1928
Notes:
Samuel Kirkland Lothrop was an archaeologist and photographer who extensively traveled and worked throughout Central America and South America. Heye originally hired Lothrop to research native Guatemalan and El Salvadoran textiles and pottery. He subsequently excavated on behalf of the Museum in such places as the Tierra del Fuego. Here he photographed indigenous communities who would not survive the twentieth century as a distinct culture group. In 1923, he also photographed the activities of the Hendricks-Hodge Hawikku Expedition excavations. In addition to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, the Peabody Museum and the Carnegie Institute sponsored his research and archaeological work.
Summary:
The S.K. Lothrop collection primarily contains negatives, photographic prints, and lantern slides made by Lothrop while employed by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Lothrop traveled on behalf of the Museum to New Mexico, Argentina, Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Peru. The four New Mexico negatives in this collection date from 1915, before Lothrop worked for the Museum, and depict scenes around Zuni. During his 1924 trip to El Salvador, Lothrop photographed volcanos, archaeological sites, antiquities, the landscape, villages, and native peoples engaged in pottery and rope making, food preparation, house building, and ceremonial activities. The 1925 views particularly concentrate on Argentina (but also Chile and Peru). The Argentina materials include views made in the Tierra del Fuego (also part of Chile), including depictions of the daily lives and ceremonial activities of natives peoples of Tierra del Fuego--Selk'nam (Ona) and Yámana (Yagán/Yahgan); the Patagonia landscape; and excavations undertaken by the Museum's La Plata Expedition. The 1928 Guatemala views include depictions of Mayan ruins of Zaculeu and of Tz'utuhil Maya (Tzutuhil/Zutigil), Quiché Maya (Quiche), and Kaqchikel Maya (Cakchiquel) people engaged in weaving, rope making, canoeing, and ceremonial actitivies. The collection also contains photographs made by Lothrop before he worked for the Museum, including 1915 views of effigy mounds in Wisconsin and views at Hopi, Acoma, and Santa Clara; 1917 views of Panama, Honduras, Costa Rica, and El Salvador; and 1918 views of Guatemala, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and Nicaragua.
Cite as:
S. K. Lothrop collection of negatives, photographs and lantern slides, 1915-1928, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Topic:
Indians of Central America
Fuegians--Social life and customs
Excavations (Archaeology)
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.010
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Frederick S. Dellenbaugh collection of photographs, negatives and other material, circa 1861-1934

Creator:
Dellenbaugh, Frederick Samuel 1853-1935
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
1 lantern slide : black and white
14 negatives : black and white
486 photographic prints : black and white, color
Type:
Lantern slides
Collection descriptions
Black-and-white negatives
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Arizona
New Mexico
Utah
Mesa Verde National Park (Colo.)
Colorado
Date:
1861
1861-1934
circa 1861-1934
Notes:
Frederick Samuel Dellenbaugh (1853-1935) was an American explorer, artist and mapmaker, best known for his travels and descriptions of the Southwest. At the age of only 18, he was chosen to accompany the second Powell expedition down the Colorado River, serving as both artist and mapmaker. In 1899, Dellenbaugh was part of the Harriman Alaska Expedition.
Summary:
Images in this collection were mostly taken by Frederick Dellenbaugh, William Henry Jackson, Alexander Gardner, John Wetherill, John K. Hillers, Edward O. Beaman, Charles Milton Bell and Frank Rinehart. Subjects include delegation portraits, images from the Hayden's and Powell's Geological and Geographical Surveys, cliff dwellings, landscape views, and images from the U.S. Indian Congress Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition in Omaha 1898.
Cite as:
Frederick S. Dellenbaugh collection of photographs, negatives and other material, circa 1861-1934, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Topic:
Hopi Indians
Ute Indians
Zuni Indians
Paiute Indians
Navajo Indians
Mohave Indians
Cheyenne Indians
Assiniboine Indians
Teton Indians
Seminole Indians
Creek Indians
Pawnee Indians
Laguna Indians
Pueblo Indians
Zia Indians
Crow Indians
Arapaho Indians
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.018
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Emry Kopta collection, 1907-1924

Creator:
Kopta, Emry
Physical description:
103 negatives : black and white
413 prints : black and white
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Arizona
Date:
1907
1907-1924
Notes:
Artist Emry Kopta lived and worked for more than twelve years at First Mesa with a Hopi family that adopted him. While living as part of the community, he made more than two hundred photographs of the Hopi, ranging from scenes of everyday life to religious ceremonies.
Summary:
The Emry collection contains images of Hopi ceremonies, including the Soyaluna Ceremony, the Niman Ceremony, Katsina dances, the Snake Dance, the Butterfly Dance and the Buffalo Dance.
Cite as:
Emry Kopta collection, 1907-1924, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Topic:
Hopi Indians
Hopi Indians--Rites and ceremonies
Snake dance
Hopi dance
Local number:
NMAI.AC.036
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

George W. Avery photographs and negatives, 1910

Creator:
Avery, George W. 1880-1927
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
50 photographic prints : black and white
7 negatives : black and white
Culture:
Seri Indians
Mayo Indians
Tarahumara Indians
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Place:
Chihuahua (Mexico : State)
Sinaloa (Mexico : State)
Sonora (Mexico : State)
Date:
1910
Notes:
George W. Avery (1880-1927) was a collector and agent for the Heye Foundation/Museum of the American Indian. In 1926, Avery collected for the museum in Mexico, possibly in the company of E.H. Davis. He also purchased pieces for Heye/MAI in Alaska.
Summary:
This collection contains 50 black-and-white photographic prints and 7 negatives taken by George W. Avery during his time as an agent for the Museum of the American Indian. Taken in 1910 in the states of Sonora, Chihuahua and Sinaloa, Mexico, the images depict members of the Seri, Mayo and Tarahumara tribes.
Cite as:
George W. Avery photographs and negatives, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (photograph or negative number)
Topic:
Indians of Mexico
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.022
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Charles B. Cory collection of copy prints and copy negatives, 1959

Creator:
Cory, Charles B (Charles Barney) 1857-1921
Physical description:
119 photographic prints : gelatin silver
10 acetate negatives : black and white ; 5 x7 inches
Culture:
Seminole
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Gelatin silver prints
Place:
Florida
Date:
1959
Notes:
A wealthy Bostonian, Charles B. Cory began collecting ornithological specimens as a young man. Eventually he amassed a superior collection of birds of the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, which he donated to Chicago's Field Museum. In 1883, he was one of forty-eight ornithologists invited to establish the American Ornithologists' Union.
Summary:
The collection contains 119 gelatin silver copy prints and 10 copy negatives made in 1959 from Cory's original prints. (The original prints likely date from 1877 to 1896, and some of these appear as illustrations in Cory's 1896 book Hunting and Fishing in Florida.) The photographs primarily consist of informal, outdoor portraits of individual and groups of Seminole men, women, and children. In addition, some photographs depict villages and dwellings and people playing games, boating, and tending domestic animals.
Cite as:
Charles B. Cory collection of copy prints and copy negatives, 1959, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (print or negative number)
Topic:
Seminole Indians
Local number:
NMAI.AC.043
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Philip H. Glover negatives and prints, 1909

Creator:
Glover, Philip H
Physical description:
30 acetate negatives : black and white ; 5 x 7 inches
1 photographic print : albumen ; 3 x 5 inches
Culture:
Piegan Indians
Type:
Albumen prints
Collection descriptions
Black-and-white negatives
Photographs
Place:
North America
Montana
Blackfeet Indian Reservation (Mont.)
Date:
1909
Summary:
This collection contains 30 black-and-white negatives and one albumen print taken by Philip H. Glover in 1909. The images depict scenes of a dance on the Blackfeet (Piegan) Reservation in Browning, Montana.
Cite as:
Philip H. Glover negatives and prints, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Topic:
Indian dance
Indians of North America
Local number:
NMAI.AC.046
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Gregory Mason collection of negatives, 1916-1931

Creator:
Mason, Gregory b. 1889
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
86 acetate negatives : black and white ; 4 x 6 inches
Culture:
Maya
Maya (archaeological culture)
Kogi (Kagaba)
Ika (Ica/Arhuaco)
Wayuu (Guajira/Goajiro)
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Place:
Colombia
Belize
Mérida (Mexico)
Chichén Itzá Site (Mexico)
Cozumel Island (Mexico)
Quiriguá Site (Guatemala)
Date:
1916
1916-1931
Notes:
Born in 1889, Gregory Mason was an American journalist with a keen interest in anthropology. Early in his career, he traveled widely as a reporter for the newspaper New York Evening Sun and the news magazine The Outlook. In 1926, he and Herbert Spinden led the Mason-Spinden expedition to explore Mayan ruins in Mexico. Funded in part by Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, Mason led four additional expeditions to Central and South America. He wrote several books, including "Silver Cities of Yucatan" (1927), "Columbus Came Late" (1931), and "Remember the Maine" (1939). From 1941 to 1954, he was chairman of the Department of Journalism at New York University. Mason died in Greenwich, Connecticut, in 1968.
Summary:
The Gregory Mason collection contains negatives made from 1916 to 1931 by Mason. The 1916 negatives depict the streets in and suburbs of Mérida, Mexico, and of people bundling fibers on a nearby plantation. The negatives dating from 1922 were made in Chichén Itzá. In 1928, Mason made negatives in Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico. The Belize negatives depict Mayan antiquities, various street scenes, and native peoples gathering leaves and chicle, spinning fiber, and canoeing; the Quintana Roo, Mexico, negatives depict Isla Cozumel and other Mayan sites; and the Guatemala negatives Quiriguá. The 1931 negatives made in Colombia primarily depict individuals from the Kogi, Ika, and Wayuu culture groups. Mason made some of these negatives on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Cite as:
Gregory Mason collection of negatives, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Topic:
Mayas--Antiquities
Indians of South America
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.029
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

John C. Casey journals

Creator:
Casey, John C
Subject:
Bowlegs, Billy 1808?-1863 or 1864
United States Office of Indian Affairs Seminole Indian Agency
Physical description:
1 linear foot
Culture:
Seminole
Type:
Letter books
Collection descriptions
Date:
1848
1848-1856
Notes:
John Charles Casey was born in England in 1809 but emigrated to the United States as a child and settled with his parents in Paterson, New Jersey. In 1925, Casey enrolled at the Military Academy and following graduation he was commissioned as Brevet Second Lieutenant in the Second Regiment of Artillery in Fort Pike, Louisiana. This fort later served as a staging area for the forced migration of Native Americans by way of the Mississippi and Arkansas River to Indian Territory. In 1831 Casey served as assistant professor of chemistry and geology at the Military Academy but was called back to Fort Pike in 1833. In 1835 the Second Artillery was sent to Tampa Bay, Florida due to increasing hostility with the Seminole community. That same year Casey was promoted to First Lieutenant and took part in several skirmishes and minor actions. He also took several trips into the new Indian Territory after being appointed Acting Agent for transferring Seminoles out of Florida. From 1839 to 1841 Casey served as Purchasing Commissary in New York City and in 1842 he was promoted to Captain, 2nd Artillery. In May 1844, Captain Casey was transferred to the 3rd Infantry. During the war with Mexico Casey was ordered to serve as Chief Commissariat of the Army commanded by Major General Zachary Taylor. At the end of the Mexican War, at his own request due to poor health, he was ordered to Fort Brooke in Tampa Bay. There, he had charge of all Commissary duties for the extensive area of southwest Florida.
In 1849 Casey became Commissioner for the Removal of the Seminole Indians from Florida. Casey was considered qualified partly due to his knowledge of the area as well as his friendly relations with Chief Billy Bowlegs. By 1852 the Bureau of Indian Affairs had been transferred from the War Department to the Interior Department and it was concluded that a new special agent be sent to replace Casey. Casey was reappointed Commissioner in 1854 and returned to Fort Brooke despite his failing health. In May of 1854, Jefferson Davis, the Secretary of War, ordered Captain Casey to suspend talks and trade with the Seminole in the belief that only coercive measures would be successful in inducing the Florida tribes to emigrate. Seeing no alternative, Billy Bowlegs led a Seminole war party in December of 1855 against Lt. George Hartsuff's patrol in the Big Cypress starting the Third Seminole War. Captain Casey who had long been fighting tuberculosis died of pulmonary consumption on December 25, 1856. It is said that Casey's remains were taken with Billy Bowlegs on the vessel Grey Cloud when Bowlegs and the remaining Seminoles departed from Edgemont Key at the close of the war in 1858. Efforts to find Casey's burial place have been unsuccessful.
Summary:
The collection of John C. Casey journals includes three original copy books of letters from Captain Casey's time as an emigration agent at the Seminole Agency in Florida from 1848 to 1856. This covers a period of time that includes the beginning of the third Seminole War. Additionally, one of the letter books also contains a journal of Casey's operations in the Indian Department in Florida from his arrival in August of 1848 until October of 1849.
Cite as:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Captain John C. Casey Journals; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Mexican War, 1846-1848
Seminole Indians--Wars
Local number:
NMAI.AC.029
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Richard Ceough papers 1943-1947

Creator:
Ceough, Richard
Subject:
Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (Mexico)
Physical description:
5 volumes
Culture:
Maya (archaeological culture)
Type:
Daybooks
Collection descriptions
Field notes
Place:
Mexico
Chiapas
Chinkultic Site (Mexico)
Date:
1943
1943-1947
Notes:
Dr. Richard Ceough was born Albert J.C. Kretzmann in Hudson, New York in 1898. Very involved in the theatre, "Richard Ceough" was most likely taken as a stage name some time in the 1920s or 1930s. Ceough graduated from New York University in 1922 and later completed his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees there as well. In 1929 Ceough appeared in several performances on the stage and spent a year teaching at NYU. In 1930, Ceough joined the faculty of the City College of New York as Assistant Professor of public speaking. While at CCNY, Ceough founded the college's theatre workshop and was director of it until his sudden death in 1947 at the age of 48 from coronary thrombosis. He also served as editor of the Theatre Annual from its founding in 1943.
In 1940, Ceough took his first trip to the Comitan region of Mexico. In 1942, Ceough returned to the Comitan region during his summer vacation and began taking part in yearly archaeological expeditions with Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History. In May of 1944, Ceough completed his first report detailing his work in the 1943 season at the "Temple of a Thousand Steps," a Mayan pyramid overlooking Agua Azul in Chiapas, Mexico. In subsequent years, Ceough presented two more informal reports on his work in Agua Azul and other areas in the Comitan region as well as publishing an article in Popular Science on Chinkultic. Ceough passed away suddenly at the City College of New York on January 9, 1947. His report from July and August of 1946 was completed and submitted posthumously to the National Institute of Anthropology and History by Blanche Corin with assistance from Javier Mandujano y Solorzano. In 1949, Corin left Ceough's material to the Hispanic Society of America in New York City which later donated these materials to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in February of 1966.
Summary:
The Richard Ceough papers include five typed and bound reports written by Ceough on his archaeological work in Chiapas, Mexico over four summer seasons from 1943-1946. There are two copies of the 1944 report. All reports were wirtten as informal reports for submission to the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico. The first report "The Temple of the Tousand Steps at Agua Azul" was written in May of 1944 and includes several maps as well as photographs taken by Ceough. The second report titled "Informal Report of the Exploration of Agua Azul and the Valley of the Lost Desires, Summer 1944" includes Ceough's day book in addition to sketches, made by Javier Mandujano, maps and photographs. The third report titled "Informal Report on the Exploration of New Virginia, Santa Elena, Agua Azul and Chincultic, Summer 1945" is the largest volume and includes Ceough's day book, sketches, maps and photographs. The photographs include landscape views as well as close up images of stelae and archaeological finds. The final report, completed after Ceough's death by Blanche Corin, is untitled but includes Ceough's day book from the summer of 1946 as well as sketches and photographs.
Cite as:
Richard Ceough papers, National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Archaeology
Maya architecture
Local number:
NMAI.AC.067
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Lawrence "Larry" James Beck papers, 1938-1994

Creator:
Beck, Larry 1938-1994
Physical description:
6 linear feet (13 boxes, 1 half-sized box, 2 oversized boxes)
Culture:
Yupik Eskimos
Type:
Correspondence
Collection descriptions
Drawings
Negatives
Newsletters
Notes
Pamphlets
Photographs
Portfolios (groups of works)
Sketches
Slides (photographs)
Place:
North America
Washington (State)
Date:
1938
1938-1994
Notes:
Lawrence "Larry" James Beck (1938-1994) was sculptor and mixed-media artist of Yup'ik descent. Born in Seattle, Washington to a non-Indian father and a Norwegian/Yup'ik mother, Beck originally studied engineering at the University of Washington before turning his attention to art. In 1964 he earned a B.A. in painting, followed by an M.F.A. in 1965.
During the late 1960s and 1970s, Beck's work focused on his large scale, abstract pieces and established his reputation as a sculptor. His early works were comprised of found metals and objects assembled in a lyrical but humorous manner. During 1975-1980, he installed projects for Golden Gardens Park in Seattle, Highline Community College and Boeing (King County Airport). He also worked on a piece for the Occidental Park site in Seattle, but due to circumstances of the city it was never installed.
In the early 1970s Beck visited the his ancestral homelands on the Alaskan coast and established a connection to Yup'ik culture. In 1973 he started to produce a new series of pieces called "Inukshuk", which is Inuit for sculpture presence. This term was also used for three major commissions that later followed and Beck continued to use Inuit terminology in his work. After the 1980 install of the Boeing sculpture, Beck experienced what he would call his sculpture career crisis. He became disappointed with public art and abandoned sculpture to focus on creating abstract Inuit Inua (spirit) masks. On March 27, 1994, Beck died of a heart attack in his home in Washington.
Summary:
The Lawrence James Beck papers contain biographical materials, sculpture portfolios, art shows, notes, sketches and drawings, publications, correspondence and visual material including photos, slides and negatives of Beck's art.
Series 1: Biographical and Personal, (undated, 1938-1994), contains resumes, personal articles and articles by Larry's friends, articles of interest to him, notes on his dreams, video tape transcription and notes on 'The Bank', the studio/home that he purchased in 1970 in Conway, Washington. Series 2: Correspondence, (undated, 1966-1994), contains correspondence pertaining to his artwork or shows, correspondence between Larry and family, also includes correspondence with the United States Government, as well as miscellaneous correspondence. Organized alphabetically and then chronologically.
Series 3: Sculptures and shows, (undated, 1966-1994), contains art show information and art projects that Larry participated in. Series 4: Sketches, drawings, notes and ideas, (undated), contains handwritten notes on artwork, or ideas of what to produce, drawings of sculptures and various ideas about sculptures. Series 5: Publications, (undated, 1966-1995), contains pamphlets, newsletters, journals and non art related publications that were of interest to Larry.
Series 6: Miscellaneous material, (undated), contains invoices of materials and non-art related purchases, shipping material receipts of artwork, resumes from other people and literature on producing sculpture. Series 7: Visual material, contains photographs, negatives and slides. All visual material is organized by influences to Larry's work, his sculptures, Larry's Native American art, family and people, and vacations and travel.
Cite as:
Lawrence James Beck papers, 1938-1994, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Indian art
Inuit masks
Public sculpture, American
Sculptors
Local number:
NMAI.AC.017
Restrictions:
Researchers must contact the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection. Contact information below
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Donald A. Cadzow Photograph Collection, 1882-1919

Creator:
Cadzow, Donald A. 1894-1960
Cadzow, Daniel
Physical description:
322 negatives
8 b&w photographic prints
Culture:
Ahtena Indians
Assiniboine Indians
Cree Indians
Dene Thá Indians
Inuit
Kainah Indians
Older Ojibwa Indians
Piegan Indians
Tsattine Indians
Vuntut Gwich'in Indians
Zuni Indians
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Place:
Alaska
Alberta
New Mexico
Prairie Provinces
Saskatchewan
Yukon Territority
Manitoba
Northwest Territories
Yukon
Date:
1882
1882-1919
Notes:
Donald A. Cadzow worked on expeditions and archeological excavations for George Gustav Heye and the Museum of the American Indian from 1916 until 1927. Between 1917 and 1919, Cadzow, collected artifacts and archaeological materials from the Copper and Kogmollok Eskimo, the Loucheux, Slavey, and Woodland Cree of Alberta, Canada. In 1919, Cadzow assisted Alanson Skinner on an archeological excavation in Cayuga County, New York. Cadzow next worked with Mark Harrington: excavating a site on Staten Island, New York in 1920; on the Hawikku expedition to study Zuni Indian culture in McKinley County, New Mexico in 1921; and to Arkansas and Missouri in 1922. In 1924 and 1925 he conducted an expedition to a prehistoric Algonkian burial site on Frontenac Island, Cayuga Lake, in New York; traveled to the Bungi tribe in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, and the Prairie Cree in Saskatchewan, Canada. He continued this work in 1926 again visiting the Prairie Cree and also the Bush Cree in Saskatchewan, the Assiniboin in Saskatchewan and Alberta; the Iroquois and the Northern Piegan (Blackfoot) in Alberta. In 1927, the last year that Cadzow worked for Heye, he assisted George P. Putnam on an expedition to Baffin Island and the Hudson Bay district to visit the Sikosuilarmiut, Akuliarmiut, and Quaumauangmiut Eskimos. Donald A. Cadzow, the son of Hugh and Nellie Cadzow, was born in Auburn, New York in 1894. In 1911, at the age of 17, he traveled to the far Canadian Northwest to live with his uncle Daniel Cadzow at the Rampart House, a Hudson Bay Company trading post on the Alaska-Yukon boundary line. After five years there, Cadzow returned to the United States. He began working for George Gustav Heye in the fall of 1916, but enlisted as seaman in the U.S.N.R.F. on January 20, 1918, only to be released from service on December 22 that same year. He returned to work for Heye at the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation on January 1, 1919, and worked there until 1928. In May of 1928 he took a job in the Bond Department of Lage & Co., a brokerage company in New York City. He was state archeologist for the Pennsylvania Historical Commission from ca. 1929-39; and executive secretary from 1939-45. He was also treasurer of the Eastern States Archeological Federation from 1940-42. In 1945 he was named executive director of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission and held the position until 1956. He died on February 9, 1960, in Pennsylvania. During his career Cadzow gave a number of lectures and radio talk programs, and published extensively in Indian Notes (Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, New York), for the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, in a variety of publications, and several books.
Summary:
Images are of the following tribes: Assiniboine, Beaver (Tsattine), Blackfoot (Piegan), Bungi (Older Ojibwa), Chippewa (Older Ojibwa), Cree (Bush, Prairie, Wood, Woodland), Eskimo, Eskimo (Copper River), Kainah (Blood), Loucheux (Gwich'in), Zuni, Slavey (Dene Thá), Yellowknife (Ahtena).
Topic:
Indians of North America
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.004
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Frederick Starr negatives and lanterns slides, 1894-1910

Creator:
Starr, Frederick 1859-1933
Photographer:
Grabic, Louis
Lang, Charles B
Physical description:
3344 Negatives
152 Lantern slides
Culture:
Acoma (N.M.)
Apache Indians
Arapaho Indians
Arikara Indians
Assiniboine Indians
Caddo Indians
Cahuilla Indians
Caraja Indians
Cherokee Indians
Cheyenne Indians
Chibcha Indians
Chinantec Indians
Flathead Indians
Ojibwa Indians
Choco Indians
Chol Indians
Chontal Indians
Cochiti (N.M.)
Crow Indians
Cuicatec Indians
Cuna Indians
Eskimo
Haida Indians
Hopi Indians
Huastec Indians
Huave Indians
Iowa Indians
Iroquois Indians
Isleta Indians
Kwakiutl Indians
Laguna (N.M.)
Macusi Indians
Mandan Indians
Mayas
Mazahua Indians
Mazatec Indians
Mehinacu Indians
Menomini Indian Tribe
Mixe Indians
Mixtec Indians
Navajo Indians
Nez Percé Indians
Osage Indians
Otomi Indians
Ottawa Indians
Pawnee Indians
Pima Indians
Ponca Indians
Potawatomi Indians
Salish Indians
San Blas
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)
Sauk and Fox Nation
Shuar Indians
Sioux Nation
Taos Pueblo (N.M.)
Tarasco Indians
Teotihuacan
Tepehua Indians
Tlaxcala
Tlingit Indians
Tonkawa Indians
Totonac Indians
Triqui
Tzeltal Indians
Tzotzil Indians
Ute Indians
Wampanoag Indians
Zapotec Indians
Zoque Indians
Zuni Indians
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Lantern slides
Place:
Guatemala
Alaska
Basin
Midwest
Northeast
Northwest
Plains
Plateau
Southern States
Southwest, New
Brazil
Colombia
Ecuador
Guiana
Arkansas
Georgia
Illinois
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Mexico
Missouri
New Mexico
New York
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Date:
1894
1894-1910
Notes:
Starr hired professional photographers Charles B. Lang and Louis Grabic to accompany him on his field trips. One lantern slide of Moses Ladd (Menomini) was taken by William H. Jackson.
Frederick Starr was born in Auburn, New York, on September 2, 1858. He received a Ph.D. in biology in 1884 at Coe College, where he was later appointed professor of biology. Starr did postgraduate work in anthropology at Yale. In 1889 he was appointed head of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, and in 1892 he was chosen by William Harper to organize the Anthropology Department at the new University of Chicago. Starr remained at the University until his retirement in 1923. Besides his field studies with various Indian tribes in the United States, Starr traveled to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Guiana, Japan, the Philippines, and Africa. He died in Tokyo, Japan, on August 14, 1933. Starr was the author of several books and scholarly articles.
Summary:
The collection includes materials from cultures in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, and Guiana: Acoma Pueblo, Apache, Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine, Caddo, Cahuilla, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chinantec, Chippewa (Ojibwa), Choco, Chol, Chontal, Cochiti Pueblo, Crow, Cuicatec, Eskimo, Flathead, Haida, Hopi, Huastec, Huave, Iowa, Iroquois, Isleta, Karaja, Kwakiutl, Laguna Pueblo, Macusi, Mandan, Maya, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mehinaku, Menomini, Mixe, Mixtec, Navajo, Nez Perce, Osage, Otomi, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pima, Ponca, Potawatomi, Salish, San Blas, San Felipe Pueblo, Sauk & Fox, Shuar, Sioux, Taos Pueblo, Tarasco, Teotihuacan, Tepehua, Tlaxcala, Tlingit, Tonkawa, Totonac, Triqui, Tzental, Tzotzil, Ute, Wampanoag, Zapotec, Zoque, Zuni.
Topic:
Indians of Central America
Indians of Mexico
Indians of North America
Indians of South America
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Leuman Maurice Waugh collection, 1909-1963

Creator:
Waugh, Leuman Maurice 1877-1972
Waugh, Donald
Subject:
American Board of Orthodontics
American Association of Dental Schools
Columbia University
New York Athletic Club
Nanuk Mi-kin-inni (Yacht)
Northland (Coast Guard cutter: WPG-49)
United States Public Health Service
Physical description:
2.1 linear ft. (5 boxes; 1 map case drawer)
1036 lantern slides
1746 photographic prints
1622 photographic negatives
80 Film Reels 16mm
Culture:
Inuit
Type:
Clippings
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
dental records
Maps
printed ephemera
Realia
Writings
Place:
Alaska
Labrador (N.L.)
Kuskokwim River (Alaska)
Date:
1909
1909-1963
Notes:
Waugh's original order was disturbed over the years after his death and during transfer from the Waugh family to the Rankin Museum. NMAI archivists elected to arrange the collection chronologically.
Dentist, professor, explorer, and lecturer, New York, NY. Born March 6, 1877 in New Dundee, Ontario, Canada, received D.D.S from University of Buffalo in 1900. Waugh went on to serve in several positions on the faculty of the University of Buffalo and the Columbia Dental School in New York, NY. He was an active member of the Explorers' Club and was Commodore of the Yatching Department of the New York Athletic Club. Waugh volunteered to undertake Alaskan studies on caries research among the Inuit for the U.S. Public Health Service. In 1929, the Health Service appointed Waugh Dental Director (Reserve) at the rank of Colonel. Waugh privately carried out a Labrador study between 1921 and 1927 over the course of five summers. Under the sometimes-partial aegis of the U.S. Public Heath Service, Waugh also studied twelve Alaskan Inuit communities between 1929 and 1938. During his trips, Waugh compiled data on the teeth, mouths, and diet of indigenous communities, in addition to photographs and films of both dental subjects and indigenous communities. In 1936, Waugh was appointed to a position with the Alaska Health Service by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior via the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Waugh's expeditions at times included three dentists (including his son, Donald Waugh), a physician and a nurse. A popular lecturer and prolific writer, Waugh continued to advocate for the health of the northern indigenous communities he visited long after his trips ended. Waugh continued to be active in professional organizations well after his retirement, until a few years before his death at his home in Betterton, Maryland, on May 6, 1972.
Summary:
Contains correspondence, clippings, essays, reports, speeches, articles, journals, logs, sketches, drawings, and other materials collected and compiled by Waugh detailing his experiences as a dentist in Arctic Alaska region and Labrador, his dental methodologies, and his personal attitudes towards the individual Inuit and Inuit communities he encountered. The Leuman Maurice Waugh papers supplement his related photograph and film holdings through the materials generated by Waugh's dental expeditions to Labrador and Arctic Alaska to treat members of Inuit communities. The materials consist of raw deal data and community census information, professional and personal correspondence, clippings and essays, reports and lectures, and logistics and trip planning documents. The photogrpah collection includes prints, lantern slides and negatives. The media collection includes 80 film reeels but they are in need of preservation and cannot be viewed.
Cite as:
Leuman Maurice Waugh collection, 1909-1963. National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Inuit--Dental care
Inuit--Census
Inuit--Names, Personal
Dentistry
Nutrition and dental health
Teeth--Radiography
Missions, Medical
Anthropology
Dentists
Orthodontists
Local number:
NMAI.AC.003
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the NMAI Archivist for an appointment to access the collection
Access restricted. Some dental records may be restricted from access, reproduction, or publication under personal health information privacy provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996. Researchers should contact the NMAI Archivist at 301-238-6624 or archives@nmai.si.edu for an appointment to access the collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

George Bird Grinnell photograph collection 1902-1904

Creator:
Grinnell, George Bird 1849-1938
Tuell, Julia E
Physical description:
119 glass plate negatives : black and white ; 7 x 9 in
Type:
Glass plate negatives
Collection descriptions
Place:
Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma
Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana
Lame Deer (Mont.)
Rosebud County (Mont.)
Washita County (Okla.)
Glacier National Park (Mont.)
Date:
1902
1902-1904
Notes:
George Bird Grinnell, naturalist, conservationist and Indian rights activist, was born into a prominent family in Brooklyn, New York. He attended Yale University, receiving his B.A. in 1870 and a Ph.D. in paleontology in 1880. While at Yale, Grinnell participated in a paleontological expedition to the central Plains, Wyoming and Utah. In 1874 he served as naturalist and paleontologist in Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer's Black Hills expedition and, in 1875, was a member of William Ludlow's expedition surveying the Yellowstone. In 1899 Grinnell was a naturalist on Edward H. Harriman Expedition to Alaska. Grinnell's lifelong interest in the west was well established long before he left Yale. In 1876, four years before he earned his Ph.D., Grinnell became the editor-in-chief and soon-to-be owner of Forest and Stream magazine. Under his leadership, it became the country's foremost natural history magazine. Grinnell was the magazine's editor from 1876 until 1911, and he used its pages to help promote the creation of national parks. Grinnell played a pivotal role in the creation of Glacier National Park in 1910.
Grinnell's interest in the west extended to its native inhabitants. He was deeply interested in Plains Indians and, year after year, spent his summers visiting different reservations. He had befriended Frank North and his Pawnee scouts, and accompanied them on buffalo and elk hunts. Grinnell witnessed the destruction of game animals, brought about by commercial hunters, and was cognizant of its impact on Plains Indians' way of life. Grinnell, a prolific writer, authored several books and many articles on Cheyenne, Blackfoot, and Pawnee Indians, the most well-know of which was the two volume work entitled "The Cheyenne Indians: Their History and Way of Life," first published in 1923. Until his death, he remained a staunch supporter of Cheyenne rights.
Grinnell was a founding member of both the Audubon Society and Boone and Crockett Club (with Theodore Roosevelt). He chaired the Council on National Parks, Forests and Wildlife, and was president of the National Parks Association. He was a trustee of the New York Zoological Society. Grinnell was also a prominent member of many other associations, such as the American Association of the Advancement of Science and New York Academy of Science. Grinnell was 89 years old when he died in New York City.
Summary:
The core of this photographic collection (1902-1904) was taken during Grinnell's visits among the Northern (Montana, Rosebud County and Rosebud River, Lame Deer) and Southern (Washita County, Oklahoma) Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne). The photographs document domestic and daily life on the reservation (especially activies involving women), religious ceremonies, camps and dwellings, and important officials. The attributions of the photographs in this collection are far from certain. While many of these images appear to have been taken by Grinnell himself, a substantial portion were also taken by his wife Elizabeth Curtis Grinnell (b. 1876) and their friend Julia E. Tuell. A very small subset of these images (3) also depicts mountains and vistas in Glacier National Park (Flathead County, Glacier County) Montana.
Topic:
Indians of North America
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.003
Restrictions:
Researchers must contact the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Frederick Johnson collection of negatives, 1915-1931 (bulk 1925-1931)

Creator:
Johnson, Frederick 1904-1994
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
451 negatives ; black and white
Culture:
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)
Algonquin [Golden Lake/Pikwàkanagàn First Nation]
Algonquin [Lac Barriere (Barriere Lake)]
Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg (Maniwaki Algonquin) [River Desert]
Anishinaabe [Parry Island, Ontario]
Potawatomi [Parry Island, Ontario]
Innu [Uashat-Maliotenam (Seven Islands)]
Innu [Mashteuiatsh (Pointe-Bleue, Quebec)]
Innu [Kiskissink]
Innu [Pessamit (Betsiamites/Bersimis)]
Mistassini Cree
Nanticoke
Rappahannock
Mohegan
Penobscot
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Place:
Québec (Province)
Nova Scotia
Newfoundland and Labrador
Delaware
Maine
Date:
1915
1915-1931
bulk 1925-1931
Notes:
Born in 1904 in Everett, Massachusetts, Frederick Johnson at an early age displayed an interest in indigenous cultures and an aptitude for indigenous languages. He studied anthropology at Tufts, the University of Massachusetts, and at the University of Pennsylvania, and eventually accompanied anthropologist and mentor Frank G. Speck on several trips throughout the Northeastern United States. Early in his career, Johnson worked with the Algonquin people and from 1917 to 1931 among the Innu, Mi'kmaq, Anishinaabe, and Mistassini Cree communities in Canada. Individuals from these communities noted that Johnson's primarily focus was to listen to elders and their stories. From 1936 to 1967, Johnson was the curator of Harvard's Peabody Museum and subsequently became the Museum's director, a post that he held until his retirement in 1969. Johnson passed away in 1994 in Lowell, Massachusetts.
Summary:
The collection consists of original negatives made from 1915 to 1931 by Johnson primary among the Mi'kmaq, Innu, Algonquin, Potawatomi, Montagnais, Abenaki, Anishinaabe, and Mistassini Cree peoples of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Quebec, Canada. The bulk were made among the Mi'kmaq, Innu, and Algonquin peoples in 1925 and from 1927 to 1931. In general, the majority of the Canada materials are informal, outdoor portraits of individuals and groups but they also depict dwellings, the construction of wigwams and birchbark canoes, carving and wood working processes, ceremonials, churches, the process of catching and smoking salmon, and the landscape. In addition there are negatives made in Maine in 1915 and Delaware from 1924 to 1926 of, respectively, the Penobscot and Nanticoke, Rappahannock, and Mohegan peoples. Again, these consist primarily of outdoor, informal portraits of individuals and groups of people.
Cite as:
Frederick Johnson collection of negatives, 1915-1931, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution (negative number)
Topic:
Indians of North America
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.038
Restrictions:
Researchers must contact the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Nacoochee Mound excavation collection of negatives, photographs, and other materials, 1915

Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Heye, George G (George Gustav) 1874-1957
Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology
Subject:
Heye, George G (George Gustav) 1874-1957
Heye, Thea
Physical description:
195 negatives : acetate
14 photographic prints
1 slide : color
1 transparency : color
Culture:
Mississippian Tradition (archaeological culture)
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Slides (photographs)
Color transparencies
Place:
Georgia
Nacoochee Valley (Ga.)
Date:
1915
Notes:
In 1915, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology collaborated to excavate the Nacoochee Mound, located in the Nacooche Valley along the upper Chattahoochee River in northeast Georgia. One of the earliest scientific excavations of its kind in the state of Georgia, the Nacoochee Mound excavation found evidence of at least two mound stages with a total of seventy-five human burials, some of them intrusive from a later time. George G. Heye, F.W. Hodge, and George H. Pepper's co-authored paper, "The Nacoochee Mound in Georgia," appeared in vol. 4, no. 3 of Contributions from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Although there is also evidence for previous occupation, archaeological evidence at the Nacoochee Mound site and the nearby Eastwood site suggests that these two mound sites probably served as local, primarily administrative, centers during the Middle Lamar Period (approximately late fifteenth to early sixteenth centuries). (particularly Eastwood) The village around Nacoochee Mound has not been excavated but is possibly the site of Nacoochee or Chota, two Cherokee villages documented by Colonel George Chicken's 1715 expedition. These two towns continued to appear on maps until the mid-eighteenth century but were abandoned shortly thereafter.
Summary:
The Nacoochee Mound excavation collection consists of negatives, photographs, slides and transparencies related to the joint effort of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology to excavate the mound in the summer of 1915. The photographic materials primarily depict the mound photographed from various directions before and during excavation, but also objects and antiquities exhumed from the mound and members of the field team posed singly and as a group on the mound site, including George G. Heye and his wife Thea Heye. Some of the photographs are attributed to Heye, but the creator of the majority of photographs is unknown.
Cite as:
Nacoochee Mound excavation negatives, photographs and other materials, 1915, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Topic:
Indians of North America--Antiqiuties
Mounds
Excavations (Archaeology)
Antiquities
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.007
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

Victor Schindler photographs and negatives, 1923

Creator:
Schindler, Victor
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
4 negatives : acetate
29 prints : albumen
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Albumen prints
Negatives
Place:
Hawikuh (N. M.)
New Mexico
Date:
1912
1923
Notes:
Victor Schindler was an anthropologist who participated in Hendricks-Hodge Expedition, which conducted archaeological excavations of the Zuni village of Hawikku (New Mexico) from 1917-1923 and was sponsored by the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation.
Summary:
The Schindler photographs and negatives contain views of the ruins at Hawikku and the surrounding environs near Zuni Pueblo (New Mexico), as well as Rain Dance images.
Cite as:
Victor Schindler photographs and negatives, 1923, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Topic:
Zuni Indians
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.011
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives

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