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The Hidden Pool

Artist:
John Henry Twachtman (1853-1902)  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
H x W: 56 x 68.8 cm (22 1/16 x 27 1/16 in)
Type:
Painting
Origin:
United States
Date:
ca. 1899
Topic:
landscape  Search this
United States  Search this
American Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1913.32a-c
Restrictions & Rights:
Copyright with museum
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1913.32a-c

Olaf Brauner letters, 1895-1938

Creator:
Brauner, Olaf M., 1869-1947  Search this
Subject:
Crisp, Arthur  Search this
Ritschel, William  Search this
Garber, Daniel  Search this
Davey, Randall  Search this
Sargent, Walter  Search this
Mason, William  Search this
Bitter, Karl Theodore Francis  Search this
Proctor, Alexander Phimister  Search this
Hopkinson, Charles  Search this
Walker, C. Howard (Charles Howard)  Search this
Spencer, Robert  Search this
Bellows, George  Search this
Prendergast, Maurice Brazil  Search this
Carlsen, Emil  Search this
Burroughs, Edith Woodman  Search this
Carlson, John F. (John Fabian)  Search this
Genth, Lillian Mathilde  Search this
Kendall, William Sergeant  Search this
Ochtman, Leonard  Search this
Waugh, Frederick Judd  Search this
Dougherty, Paul  Search this
Redfield, Edward Willis  Search this
Hassam, Childe  Search this
Caffin, Charles Henry  Search this
Glackens, William J. (William James)  Search this
Benson, Frank Weston  Search this
Lie, Jonas  Search this
Speicher, Eugene Edward  Search this
Hubbell, Henry Salem  Search this
Henri, Robert  Search this
Washington, Booker T.  Search this
Tryon, Dwight William  Search this
Johansen, John C. (John Christen)  Search this
Kroll, Leon  Search this
Melchers, Gari  Search this
Beal, Gifford  Search this
Pratt, Bela L. (Bela Lyon)  Search this
Macbeth, William  Search this
Metcalf, Willard Leroy  Search this
Cornell University  Search this
Topic:
Art museums, University and college  Search this
Art  Search this
Painters  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7188
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209325
AAA_collcode_brauolaf
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209325

William Macbeth papers, 1870-1919

Creator:
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
Subject:
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
Type:
Travel diaries
Diaries
Topic:
Art galleries, Commercial  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7936
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210104
AAA_collcode_macbwill
Theme:
Diaries
The Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210104

Max Bohm papers, 1873-1970, bulk 1880-1959

Creator:
Bohm, Max, 1868-1923  Search this
Subject:
Thiel, Philip  Search this
Longyear, Mary Beecher  Search this
Hunt, Clyde de Vernet  Search this
Macbeth, Robert W. (Robert Walker)  Search this
Bohm, Zella Newcomb  Search this
Locke, Esther Bohm  Search this
Macbeth, William  Search this
Salmagundi Club  Search this
Beachcombers (Organization)  Search this
Type:
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Diaries
Topic:
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Painters  Search this
Art  Search this
Christian Scientists  Search this
France  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8893
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211078
AAA_collcode_bohmmax
Theme:
Diaries
Sketches & Sketchbooks
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211078
Additional Online Media:

Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892-1953

Creator:
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
Subject:
Stuart, Gilbert  Search this
Macbeth, Robert W. (Robert Walker)  Search this
Weir, Robert Walter  Search this
McIntyre, Robert G. (Robert George)  Search this
Macbeth, William  Search this
Hartley, Marsden  Search this
Homer, Winslow  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Daguerreotypes
Topic:
Art notes  Search this
Crayon  Search this
Curators  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial  Search this
Eight (Group of American artists)  Search this
Art directors  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Art  Search this
Artists  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9703
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211939
AAA_collcode_macbgall
Theme:
Art Movements and Schools
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211939
Additional Online Media:

Domestic, K-R

Collection Creator:
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 13
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1912-1913
Scope and Contents note:
Kuhn, Walt

Loewenstein, Dr. Helen C.

Macbeth, William

Mather, Frank J. Jr.

McGrath, Mrs. F.S.

McKinney, Miss E.

Meltzer, Charlotte

Morgan, Daniel H.

Ninkivell, Frank S.

Norton, Mrs. Porter

Oakman, John

Of, George F.

Pepper, Charles Hovey

Pleuthner, Walter Karl

Potter, Louis (see Gorham Co.)

Prendergast, Maurice

Pruyn, Francis L.

Quinn, John

Reisinger, Hugo

Rumsey, Mrs. Charles Cary
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records, 1859-1984. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records
Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records / Series 1: Armory Show Records / 1.1: Correspondence / 1.1.2: Artists and Lenders Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-kuhnwalt-ref32

Telegram to William Macbeth from M. O'Brien & Sons

Subject:
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen)  Search this
Macbeth, William  Search this
Manet, Edouard  Search this
Puvis de Chavannes, Pierre  Search this
O'Brien Galleries (Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Armory Show (1913 : Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Type:
Correspondence
Date:
1913 March 21
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)15387
See more items in:
Walt Kuhn, Kuhn family papers, and Armory Show records, 1859-1984, bulk 1900-1949
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_15387
Additional Online Media:

Winslow Homer, Scarborough, ME letter to William Macbeth, New York, N.Y.

Creator:
Homer, Winslow, 1836-1910  Search this
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
Subject:
Homer, Winslow  Search this
Macbeth, William  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
Type:
Correspondence
Date:
1892 August 3
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)17456
See more items in:
Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892-1953
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_17456

Charles Henry Hart, New York, N.Y. letter to William Macbeth, New York, N.Y.

Creator:
Hart, Charles Henry, 1847-1918  Search this
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
Subject:
Hart, Charles Henry  Search this
Macbeth, William  Search this
Type:
Correspondence
Date:
1916 April 1
Topic:
Art dealers  Search this
Portrait painting, American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)17457
See more items in:
Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892-1953
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_17457
Additional Online Media:

Maynard Dixon to William Macbeth

Creator:
Dixon, Maynard, 1875-1946  Search this
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
Type:
Correspondence
Date:
1923 June 26
Topic:
Art galleries, Commercial  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)1890
See more items in:
Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892-1953
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_1890
Additional Online Media:

Charles Sheeler to William Macbeth

Creator:
Sheeler, Charles, 1883-1965  Search this
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
Subject:
Macbeth, William  Search this
Sheeler, Charles  Search this
Type:
Correspondence
Date:
1910 Sept. 26
Topic:
Art criticism  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial  Search this
Art--Technique  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)488
See more items in:
Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892-1953
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_488
Additional Online Media:

Art Notes

Creator:
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
Type:
Printed Materials
Date:
1896 Nov.-Dec.
Topic:
Art galleries, Commercial  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)5327
See more items in:
Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892-1953
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_5327

Macbeth Gallery records

Creator:
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
Names:
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Homer, Winslow, 1836-1910  Search this
Macbeth, Robert W. (Robert Walker), 1884-1940  Search this
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
McIntyre, Robert G. (Robert George), b. 1885  Search this
Stuart, Gilbert, 1755-1828  Search this
Weir, Robert Walter, 1803-1889  Search this
Extent:
131.6 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Daguerreotypes
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1947-1948
1838-1968
bulk 1892-1953
Summary:
The Macbeth Gallery records provide almost complete coverage of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1892 to its closing in 1953. Through extensive correspondence files, financial and inventory records, printed material, scrapbooks, reference and research material, and photographs of artists and works of art, the records document all aspects of the gallery's activities, charting William Macbeth's initial intention to lease his store "for the permanent exhibition and sale of American pictures" through over sixty years of success as a major New York firm devoted to American art. The collection measures 131.6 linear feet and dates from 1838 to 1968 with the bulk of the material dating from 1892 to 1953.
Scope and Content Note:
The Macbeth Gallery records provide almost complete coverage of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1892 to its closing in 1953. The records document all aspects of the gallery's activities, charting William Macbeth's initial intention to lease his store "for the permanent exhibition and sale of American pictures" through over sixty years of success as a major New York firm devoted to American art. The collection measures 131.6 linear feet and dates from 1838 to 1968 with the bulk of the material dating from 1892 to 1953.

The gallery's correspondence files form the core of the collection and illuminate most aspects of American art history: the creation and sale of works of art, the development of reputations, the rise of museums and art societies, change and resistance to change in the art market, and the evolution of taste. Ninety-five feet of correspondence house substantial and informative letters from dozens of important American painters and sculptors, including older artists and younger contemporaries of the gallery in its later years. There are also letters from collectors, curators, other galleries, and critics.

The financial files found in the collection offer insight into the changing economic climate in which the gallery operated. They include information ranging from the details of individual sales and the market for individual artists, to consignment activities and artist commissions, to overviews of annual sales. This information is augmented by the firm's inventory records and the photographs of artwork with their accompanying records of paintings sold. The inventory records provide details of all works of art handled by the gallery, both sold and unsold, and the buyers who purchased them; the photographs of artwork include images of artwork sold with accompanying sales information.

The highlight of the gallery's printed material is the publication Art Notes. Although published only until 1930, Art Notes provides an excellent and detailed view of the gallery's exhibition schedule and the relationship of the gallery owners with many of the artists whose work they handled. It was a house organ that also provided a running commentary on events in the art world. The gallery's 19 fragile scrapbooks, maintained throughout the firm's history, provide further coverage of activities through exhibition catalogs and related news clippings. Printed material from other sources provides a frame of reference for activities in the art world from the mid-19th to the mid-20th-centuries and includes an almost complete run of the rare and important pre-Civil War art publication The Crayon.

Reference files record the interest which the gallery owners took in the work of early portrait painters and in later artists such as George Inness and Winslow Homer. Together with the immense volume of correspondence with buyers and sellers of paintings by the great portraitists and the Hudson River School found in the gallery's correspondence files, these records are still useful sources of information today and underscore the deep interest that the Macbeths and Robert McIntyre took in 18th and 19th-century American art.

The photographs of artists found here are a treasure trove of images of some of the major figures of the 19th and 20th-centuries. There are photographs of artists such as Chester Beach, Emil Carlsen, Charles Melville Dewey, Frederick Carl Frieseke, Childe Hassam, Winslow Homer, George Inness, Maurice Prendergast, and Julian Alden Weir, many of them original prints and the majority of them autographed.

With the exception of the "The Eight" and a few of their contemporaries, an important aspect of art history, the modernist movement, is generally represented in the Macbeth Gallery records only in a negative form as the three successive proprietors of the gallery showed very little interest in this area. Nevertheless, the collection is a highly significant source of information on many of the major and minor figures in American art in the period after 1890.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into eight series:

Series 1: Correspondence, 1838-1968 (Box 1-95, 163-164, OV 165; 96.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Financial and Shipping Records, 1892-1956 (Box 96-110; 11.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Inventory Records, 1892-circa 1957 (Box 111-113; 3.0 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1838-1963 (Box 114-119, 162; 5.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Scrapbooks, 1892-1952 (Box 120-130; 3.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Reference Files, 1839-1959 (Box 131-132; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 7: Miscellaneous Files, 1912-1956 (Box 133-134; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1880-circa 1968 (Box 135-161; 12.1 linear feet)
Historical Note:
The Macbeth Gallery was established in 1892 by William Macbeth, a Scotch-Irish immigrant who had spent ten years with the print dealer Frederick Keppel before he opened his doors to the art-buying public at 237 Fifth Avenue in New York. Despite the prevailing interest in foreign art at that time, particularly in that of the Barbizon and Dutch schools, Macbeth was determined to dedicate his gallery to "the permanent exhibition and sale of American pictures, both in oil and water colors."

Although some of the gallery's earliest exhibitions were of work by European artists, the business soon became the only gallery in continuous operation to keep American art permanently on display. In the January 1917 issue of Art Notes, Macbeth recounts those early days remembering that "The opening of my gallery......was a rash venture under the existing conditions, and disaster was freely predicted." Nevertheless, he struggled through the financial crisis of 1893 and persisted with his devotion to American art; slowly the market for his pictures grew more amenable.

Macbeth moved to more spacious quarters at 450 Fifth Avenue in 1906 and two years later undertook what was to become the major event in the gallery's early history: the 1908 exhibition of "The Eight," featuring work by Arthur B. Davies, Willam J. Glackens, Robert Henri, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, Everett Shinn, and John Sloan. "The Eight" were an unlikely combination of social realists, visionaries and impressionists eager to challenge the dominating influence of the National Academy. The exhibition received an immense amount of publicity and instantly entered into art history as a successful assault on tradition.

Despite the splash that the exhibition made and its implications for the future of American art, nothing that the gallery did subsequently indicated that Macbeth intended to capitalize on its significance. It is true that Macbeth supported many artists later considered leaders in American art when the public would pay no attention to them because of their modernist tendencies; Arthur B. Davies, Paul Dougherty, Maurice Prendergast, Theodore Robinson, and F. Ballard Williams all held their first exhibitions at his gallery. Nevertheless, neither Macbeth nor the gallery's two successive proprietors, Robert G. McIntyre (William's nephew) and Robert Macbeth (William's son), who joined the gallery in 1903 and 1906 respectively, ever developed a true interest in modern art. The November 1930 issue of Art Notes summarizes their collective disdain for modernism, stating: "We believe that, by and large, modern art is amusing. We are heretical enough to believe that much of it was started for the amusement of its creators and that no one was more surprised than they when it was taken seriously by a certain audience to whom the bizarre and the unintelligible always makes an appeal." So while the Macbeths and McIntyre cetainly championed American artists and insisted they deserved as much recognition as the Europeans, their deepest and most abiding interest was undoubtedly the established artists of the 18th and 19th-centuries and those of the early 20th-century who continued in a more conservative style. Artists such as Emil Carlsen, Charles Harold Davis, Frederick C. Frieseke, Robert Henri, Winslow Homer, Chauncey F. Ryder, Abbot Handerson Thayer, J. Francis Murphy, A. H. Wyant were the gallery's bread and butter.

When William Macbeth died in 1917 Robert Macbeth took up the reins with the assistance of Robert G. McIntyre . Although they incorporated the business as William Macbeth, Inc., in 1918 the gallery continued to be known, as it always would be, simply as Macbeth Gallery. Macbeth and McIntyre continued to show work in the same vein as the elder Macbeth. They concentrated primarily on oil paintings at this time, having found by the 1920s that "oils are all that our gallery owners will buy," though they also exhibited an occasional group of watercolors and pastels in addition to bronzes and other sculpture by contemporary American artists such as Chester Beach and Janet Scudder.

Of the early American painters the Macbeths and McIntyre were particularly interested in colonial portraits and miniatures, especially those painted by prominent artists in the latter part of the eighteenth century such as John Singleton Copley, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Sully and John Trumbull. In its early years the gallery also handled the work of a few prominent American etchers including Frank W. Benson, Emil Fuchs, Daniel Garber, Childe Hassam and Chauncey F. Ryder. The print department was generally discontinued, however, in the late 1930s although the gallery continued to show prints by contemporaries such as Stow Wengenroth.

In 1924 relative prosperity allowed the gallery to move uptown to 15 East Fifty-seventh Street. When the 1930s brought new financial hardship for the gallery Macbeth and McIntyre took a variety of approaches to boosting sales. In 1930 they decided to hold only group exhibitions throughout the season to the exclusion of one-man shows, and also held some special exhibitions of paintings priced at a hundred dollars each in the hope that they could tempt those "willing to take advantage of a rare chance to secure representative examples of good art at a most attractive price." A move to smaller quarters at 15 East Fifty-seventh Street in 1935 was made with the intention of concentrating their efforts on the work of fewer contemporary artists, while continuing to handle the work of the older Americans they had long supported.

When Macbeth died suddenly and unexpectedly in August 1940 following an operation for appendicitis, McIntyre continued to run the gallery with the assistance of Hazel Lewis. During the 1940s McIntyre and Lewis showed primarily contemporary art in a wide range of media including oil, watercolor, pastel, drawing and sculpture, while continuing, as always, to show the occasional group of 19th-century Americans. The great success of the gallery's later years was undeniably Andrew Wyeth whose first exhibition, held at Macbeth Gallery in 1937, resulted in the sale of all twenty-two paintings cataloged.

Although subsequent Wyeth exhibitions were also successful, McIntyre struggled financially throughout the 1940s and periodically considered liquidating the company. Although "vitally interested" in contemporary art by people such as Robert Brackman, Jay Connaway, Carl Gaertner, James Lechay, Herbert Meyer and Ogden M. Pleissner he found that, for the most part, it did not pay. McIntyre continued operations until 1953 when he decided that doing so for profit was not only a financial burden but also ran contrary to his desire to spend more time devoted to his first love, early American art. When the lease expired on 11 East Fifty-seventh Street in April 1953 McIntyre did not renew it. After closing the gallery's doors he sold art from his New York apartment and from his home in Dorset, Vermont. He officially dissolved William Macbeth, Inc., in 1957.

The history of the Macbeth Gallery is a long and distinguished one with each successive proprietor making a significant contribution to art in America. William Macbeth helped establish an audience and a market for American art when few were willing to give it serious consideration. Robert Macbeth continued to cement the gallery's reputation as one of the leading firms in New York and was instrumental in organizing the American Art Dealers Association. Robert G. McIntyre claimed in a letter to Lloyd Goodrich, dated 22 June 1945, that the thing of which he was most proud was "the share I have had in the formation of the collection of the Addison Gallery of American Art, at Andover, Massacusetts." McIntyre was widely respected in the art community as a dealer, as an adviser to curators, and as a scholar whose research and book on Martin Johnson Heade helped "rediscover" an important American artist. One of his most significant and lasting contributions to the history of art in America, however, was undoubtedly his gift of the gallery's historical records to the Archives of American Art.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American are a small collection of scattered Robert McIntyre's papers and 9 items of William Macbeth's papers. Macbeth Gallery exhibition catalogs are also available in the American Art Exhibition Catalog collection and the Brooklyn Museum Records, both loaned and microfilmed collections.

An extensive collection of Macbeth Gallery exhibition catalogs are also held by the Frick Art Reference Library and the Watson Library of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Provenance:
The bulk of the Macbeth Gallery records were donated and microfilmed in several installments between 1955 and 1966 by Robert G. McIntyre and Estate. Additional Macbeth Gallery printed material was donated by Phoebe C. and William Macbeth II, grandchildren of William Macbeth, in 1974.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Fragile original scrapbooks are closed to researchers.
Rights:
The Macbeth Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Eight (Group of American artists)  Search this
Art directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Daguerreotypes
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892 to 1953. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.macbgall
See more items in:
Macbeth Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-macbgall
Additional Online Media:

Thomas B. Clarke letters from or about Homer Dodge Martin, 1893-1897

Creator:
Clarke, Thomas B. (Thomas Benedict), 1848-1931  Search this
Martin, Homer Dodge, 1836-1897  Search this
Subject:
Schuyler, Montgomery  Search this
Macbeth, William  Search this
Topic:
Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art patrons  Search this
Painters  Search this
Art  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7029
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209162
AAA_collcode_clartbhm
Theme:
The Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209162
Additional Online Media:

W. A. Leonard receipt from purchase of a print, 1875

Creator:
Leonard, W. A.  Search this
Subject:
Macbeth, William  Search this
Dürer, Albrecht  Search this
Keppel, Frederick  Search this
Topic:
Art galleries, Commercial  Search this
Gallery owners  Search this
Art  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7881
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210048
AAA_collcode_leonw
Theme:
The Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210048

Robert G. McIntyre papers, 1903-1957

Creator:
McIntyre, Robert G. (Robert George), 1885-1965  Search this
Subject:
James, William  Search this
Macbeth, William  Search this
Morgan, Patrick  Search this
Colburn, Francis Peabody  Search this
Rosenthal, Albert  Search this
Corbino, Jon  Search this
Morgan, Maud Cabot  Search this
Stuart, Gilbert  Search this
Marsh, Felicia Meyer  Search this
Heade, Martin Johnson  Search this
Macbeth, Robert W. (Robert Walker)  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
Topic:
Art historians  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7959
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210127
AAA_collcode_mcinrobe
Theme:
The Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210127

Max Bohm papers

Creator:
Bohm, Max, 1868-1923  Search this
Names:
Beachcombers (Organization)  Search this
Salmagundi Club  Search this
Bohm, Zella Newcomb  Search this
Hunt, Clyde du Vernet  Search this
Locke, Esther Bohm, d. 1913  Search this
Longyear, Mary Beecher, 1851-1931  Search this
Macbeth, Robert W. (Robert Walker), 1884-1940  Search this
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
Extent:
5.6 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Paintings
Photographs
Drawings
Diaries
Place:
France -- description and travel
Date:
1873-1970
bulk 1880-1959
Summary:
The papers of painter Max Bohm measure 5.6 linear feet and date from 1873-1970, with the bulk of the material dating from 1880-1959. Biographical material includes a file concerning the Provincetown artist's club The Beachcombers. Also found is detailed family correspondence, as well as general correspondence that includes exchanges with patron Mary Beecher Longyear and dealer William Macbeth. The papers contain scattered business records; five diaries written by Bohm's wife Zella; other notes and writings; art work including fifteen sketchbooks, loose drawings, and oil paintings; printed material; and photographs of Bohm, his family, and colleagues including artists attending a Salmagundi dinner. There is also a motion picture film Six Foot Art, in Which Max Bohm, Member of the National Academy Tells How He Does It.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter Max Bohm measure 5.6 linear feet and date from 1873-1970, with the bulk of the material dating from 1880-1959. Biographical material includes a file concerning the Provincetown artist's club The Beachcombers. Also found within the papers is detailed family correspondence, as well as general correspondence that includes exchanges with patron Mary Beecher Longyear and dealer William Macbeth. Also found are scattered business records; five diaries written by Bohm's wife Zella; other notes and writings; art work including sketchbooks, loose drawings, and oil paintings; printed material; and photographs of Bohm, his family, and colleagues including artists attending a Salmagundi dinner. There is also a motion picture film Six Foot Art, in Which Max Bohm, Member of the National Academy Tells How He Does It.

Family correspondence consists of letters exchanged between various Bohm family members during their long periods of separation. Decades of almost daily exchanges of letters offer detailed descriptions of Bohm's activities in pursuit of notoriety as an artist including his frequent travels in Europe and the United States, attendance of art-related and other cultural events, and his thoughts about art, philosophy, and his strong opposition to German aggression in World War I. The often affectionate letters from Bohm's wife Zella describe her concerns over finances and raising the children during Bohm's frequent absences, but also include descriptions of their summers in coastal France.

Professional correspondence consists of scattered letters discussing art-related business with colleagues including Bohm's longtime patron and Christian Science advocate, Mary Beecher Longyear, and Macbeth Gallery owners Robert and William Macbeth.

Scattered business records include price lists for art work, banking records, and miscellaneous receipts.

Five diaries and loose diary pages written by Bohm's wife Zella contain detailed descriptions of daily activities and her observations and thoughts, some drawings, notes, and financial notations. Some of the diaries contain annotations by her daughter, Esther.

Notes and writings include notebooks containing original short stories and miscellaneous sketches by Bohm, lists of art work, miscellaneous notes including several written by Esther Bohm, and miscellaneous writings by and about Bohm including his typescript "An Artist's Philosophy."

Art work consists of fifteen sketchbooks, miscellaneous drawings including a self-portrait, and oil paintings on board and on unstretched canvases including Bohm's studies of works by Titian and Van Dyke, and a painting of a young Esther Bohm looking at the sea. Works by others include a batik design on silk by Zella Bohm, a watercolor by Bohm's aunt, Anna Stuhr Weitz, and an oil portrait of Zella by her granddaughter.

Printed material primarily consists of clippings generated by Bohm's participation in the Paris Salons, in addition to several exhibition announcements and catalogs for Bohm and for others, and reproductions of art work by Bohm and others. There are also 2 copies of a silent, black and white Pathé newsreel titled Six Foot Art, in Which Max Bohm, Member of the National Academy Tells How He Does It on 16mm and 35mm film reels.

Photographs are of Bohm and his family, colleagues including Clyde du Vernet Hunt in his studio and a Salmagundi Club "Get Together" dinner, views of the town of Etaples, France, and of works of art by Bohm and others.
Arrangement:
The papers have been organized into 8 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1898-1970 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1, OV 8)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1880-1955 (3.3 linear feet; Boxes 1-4, 7)

Series 3: Business Records, 1910-1930 (0.2 linear feet; Box 4)

Series 4: Diaries, 1887-1916 (0.2 linear feet; Box 4)

Series 5: Notes and Writings, 1882-circa 1970 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 4, 7)

Series 6: Art Work, 1873-1951 (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 4-5, 7, OVs 8-10)

Series 7: Printed Material and Motion Picture Film, 1886-1957 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 5-7, FC 11-12)

Series 8: Photographs, 1886-1959 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 6-7)
Biographical / Historical:
Max Bohm was born on January 21, 1868, in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Henry and Emilie Bohm.

Bohm began his study of art in 1887 when he accompanied his aunt, Anna Stuhr, on the first of several voyages to France. He studied in artist communities in Brittany and in Paris at the Académie Julian with Boulanger, Lefebvre, and Benjamin Constant. He also traveled to Belgium, The Netherlands, and Germany.

In 1895, Bohm attended an open school of painting in Etaples on the coast of France, and during the winter months he taught painting at a school in London, England. His painting En Mer was awarded the Gold Medal by the Paris Salon of 1897.

While teaching in Etaples in 1898, Bohm married one of his pupils, Zella Newcomb, an art teacher from Carlton College in Minnesota. In 1900, the Bohms traveled to Italy for several months before returning to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where Bohm established a studio. After trying to find affordable studio and living space in New York City, Bohm moved his family back to France in 1902. Bohm established a studio in Paris for two years and during the summer months his wife and children moved to the less expensive and cooler coastal towns of France. Bohm continued to display his work in the annual Paris Salons.

From 1905 until the summer of 1908, the Bohm family lived primarily in England. In 1909, Bohm entered and won the Cleveland Court House mural competition, prompting the family to return to the United States for several months. They returned to Paris the following year, where Bohm established a studio and worked on the Cleveland Court House mural. Again, Bohm's wife and children would live in French coastal towns, while Bohm was on extended visits to Paris, London, or the United States.

Sometime around 1911, Bohm became acquainted with Mrs. Mary Beecher Longyear, a wealthy follower of Mary Baker Eddy and Christian Science. Over the next decade, Mrs. Longyear commissioned many works by Bohm and supported his career. In May of 1912 Bohm's mural, First New England Town Meeting, was installed in the new Cleveland Court House and arrangements were made with Macbeth Galleries to exhibit Bohm's work. Late in 1913, Bohm became involved with the Pan-Pacific International Exposition where his painting Promenade won the Gold Medal in 1915.

During World War I, the Bohm family fled France and temporarily settled in Tuckahoe, New York, and Bohm made frequent visits to his patron, Mrs. Longyear, in Boston. In 1916, the Knoedler Gallery exhibited Bohm's murals for Mrs. Longyear's music room. Also during this time, the family enjoyed spending summers in Provincetown, where Bohm joined The Beachcombers, an organization of artists.

In 1919, the Bohms built a house in Bronxville, New York, for easy access to New York City, while simultaneously purchasing a cottage in Provincetown. While the house was being constructed, Zella and the children became boarders in the home of painter Spencer Nichols, who also lived in Bronxville. During this year, Max Bohm, Jr., entered Harvard University while Mrs. Longyear continued to provide commissions for Max Bohm's art work.

Between 1922 and 1923, Bohm had exhibitions in Greenwich, Connecticut, Washington, D.C., and at the Grand Central Galleries, with his painting En Mer being exhibited at the National Academy of Design.

Max Bohm died on September 19, 1923 in Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels 420-421) including biographical material, scattered letters, notes and writings, drawings, clippings, exhibition catalogs, booklets, a scrapbooks, and photographs of Bohm, his family, colleagues, and residences. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.

The original Six Foot Art film was also transferred to 16mm and 35mm film reels in the 1970s, but is not in the collection.
Provenance:
Kathryn Esther Locke and Elizabeth Schwarz, the artist's daughters, lent the material on microfilm reels 420-421 and donated papers in 1972.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Max Bohm papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Christian Scientists  Search this
Painting, American -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Paintings
Photographs
Drawings
Diaries
Citation:
Max Bohm papers, 1873-1970, bulk 1880-1959. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bohmmax
See more items in:
Max Bohm papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bohmmax
Additional Online Media:

Thomas B. Clarke letters from or about Homer Dodge Martin

Creator:
Clarke, Thomas B. (Thomas Benedict), 1848-1931  Search this
Names:
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
Martin, Homer Dodge, 1836-1897  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1893-1897
Summary:
The Thomas B. Clarke letters from or about Homer Dodge Martin measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1893-1897. Twenty-two letters from Martin to art collector and patron Thomas B. Clarke, document Martin's work, his financial struggles, and his physical and mental condition in the last 5 years of his life. Additional letters to and from others further illuminate Martin's relationship with Clarke and provide insight into his financial affairs and the increasingly favorable market for the painter's work just prior to and following his death in 1897.
Scope and Content Note:
This collection measures 0.2 linear feet, including 22 letters from Homer Martin to art patron Thomas Clarke, and dates from 1893-1897. Since Martin kept no diaires or sales ledgers himself, the letters are invaluable in understanding his painting, financial struggles, and his physical and mental condition in the last 5 years of his life. Additional letters from Martin's son, Ralph, his wife, Elizabeth, and gallery owner William Macbeth, and a letter from Martin to his friend Montgomery Schuyler, further illuminate Clarke's activities as a dealer and patron of Martin's work, and provide insight into Martin's financial affairs and the increasingly favorable market for the painter's work just prior to and following his death in 1897.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 1 series:

Series 1: Thomas B. Clarke Letters From or About Homer Dodge Martin, 1893-1897 (Box 1; 9 folders)
Biographical Note:
Thomas Benedict Clarke (1848-1931) was a New York prosperous merchant who began collecting American art in the 1870s. Over the course of the next 20 years he actively traded, loaned, and sold artwork through dealers in New York City, outlets in Worcester, Cincinnati and St. Louis, and with artists. He also shared his collection through public and private exhibitions in New York and elsewhere. He earned praise from the critics for being the foremost patron of American painters during the late 1800s and was praised by many painters for his attention to American artists at a time when they considered themselves neglected or ignored.

Hudson River School painter Homer Dodge Martin (1836-1897) was one of the artists for whom Clarke acted as patron. Martin studied briefly with James Hart and spent his summers during the 1860s sketching in the Adirondacks, the Catskills and the White Mountains and then painted landscapes from the sketches he made at his studio in New York City's Tenth Street Studio Building.

In 1876 he took his first trip to Europe and from 1882-1886 lived in Normandy, France. There he was influenced both by the Barbizon school of painting and the Impressionists and his painting took on darker, more melancholy tones.

By 1887 Martin had returned to New York and in 1893 moved to St. Paul, Minnesota. During the 1890s Martin was plagued by ill health and financial struggles. A dead optic nerve in one eye and a cataract in the other, left him close to blindness when he died in February 1897. At the time of his death two of his greatest paintings, Westchester Hills (circa 1887) and Harp of the Winds (1895), remained unsold and another, Adirondack Scenery (1895) had been bought by Clarke for circa $400.

In 1890, Clarke had dissolved his dry-goods partnership, Clarke & King, and announced that he would no longer deal in American pictures except as an agent for George Inness. Clarke opened a showroom known as "Art House" in 1891 on Fifth Avenue in New York City, and began dealing primarily in Oriental porcelains and Greek antiquities. The Martin letters are one source of evidence that Clarke did, however, continue to deal in American art as a private agent through Macbeth Gallery and others. A letter written on Clarke's behalf to Martin dated April 17, 1896, stated that he had contacted Samuel P. Avery on Martin's behalf, and suggested that he consign his paintings to Avery, rather than having Clarke promote them himself.

In January 1899 Clarke announced that he would dispose of his American pictures at auction following a week long exhibition at the American Art Association. In February 1899, 7 of the 10 Homer Martin paintings in Clarke's possession were sold at that auction, including Adirondack Scenery for $5500. Within two years of his death, Martin's Harp of the Winds was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In addition to the Metropolitan Museum, Martin's work can be found in other important American museums including the Addison Gallery of American Art, the Albany Institute of History and Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. He became a member of the National Academy of Design in 1874 and was one of the founders of the Society of American Artists.
Related Material:
The James Stillman letters relating to Homer Dodge Martin have also been digitized and are available online via the Archives of American Art's website. Additional material relating to Homer Dodge Martin, including correspondence with Thomas B. Clarke and Elizabeth Martin, can be found in the Macbeth Gallery records at AAA.
Provenance:
Most of the letters were donated by Charles Feinberg in 1957. Four additional letters were given to the Archives by Irving Burton in 1967.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Thomas B. Clarke letters from or about Homer Dodge Martin are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painters  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art patrons -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Citation:
Thomas B. Clarke letters from or about Homer Dodge Martin, 1893-1897. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.clartbhm
See more items in:
Thomas B. Clarke letters from or about Homer Dodge Martin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-clartbhm
Additional Online Media:

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1854, 1882-1963
Scope and Contents note:
Eighty years of Johnson's general correspondence primarily consists of personal letters with friends, family, and fellow artists. There is also a substantial amount of correspondence with her son, Alfred Dasburg. The bulk of the correspondence dates from 1906 to 1919.

Because Alfred spent most of his childhood living in Taos with his father, Andrew Dasburg, or away at school or camp, Johnson's correspondence with her son provides very candid and detailed accounts of her daily activities. The letters discuss her current artwork, news from her friends and relatives, and her travels, including her stay in Taos, New Mexico in 1919. Also included are numerous letters written during her stay in a mental hospital from 1937 to 1938. Many of her later letters to Alfred include reminiscences of her youth and extensive self-analysis.

General correspondence with other family and friends is extensive and most often discusses social events, news of family and friends, and other daily activities of the writer. Family correspondence includes numerous letters between Johnson and her siblings, especially her brother Van Cleve Johnson. Grace Mott Johnson corresponded with numerous painter and sculptor friends whom she met at the Art Students' League and in Woodstock, New York. Some of these include Marion Bullard, Russell Cowles, John F. and Margaret Carlson, Florence Ballin Cramer, Florence Lucius, Walter Frankl, Lila Wheelock Howard, with whom she shared a studio for a period of time, Thomas Hunt, Henry Lee McFee, Morgan Russell, Mary Riley, Lee Simonson, Lindsey Morris Sterling, and Alice Morgan Wright. Johnson was also close friends with the Davidson family, and found here is her correspondence with the sculptor Jo Davidson and his two sisters Ray and Rose. Other notable correspondence is with friend Vera Spier Kuhn, wife of artist Walt Kuhn, art patron Mable Dodge Luhan, journalist John Reed, gallery owner William Macbeth, and her psychiatrist Abraham Brill. Also found is a small amount of correspondence documenting Johnson's civil rights activities, including letters from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

This subseries also includes the correspondence of Frances H. Johnson, Grace Mott Johnson's aunt, also known as Aunt Fanny, with whom she was very close. Found here are postcards and letters from family and friends as well as numerous letters between Frances and Grace Mott Johnson, including several detailed letters from Grace describing her time in Taos.

See Appendix B for a select list of correspondents from Series 2.2.
Appendix B: Correspondents from Series 2.2: Grace Mott Johnson Papers, General Correspondence:
Barclay, Jessie: 1909

Bercinsky, David: 1911, 1929, undated

Bercinsky, Rachel: 1906, 1908

Bigelow, Poultney: 1910, 1911, undated

Borglum, Gutzon: 1908

Bradenburgh, Margaret Caspar: 1908, 1910, 1911, 1915, 1916, 1919, 1940

Brill, Abraham A.: 1919, 1921, 1935, 1937-40, 1948

Bullard, Eleanor: 1909

Bullard, Marion: 1911, 1912, undated

Cahen, J. B.: 1907

Carlson, John F. & Margaret: 1907-1913, 1921, 1947

Comeau, Martin F.: 1943, 1944

Cook, Charles Bayley: 1911

Cowles, Russell: 1909

Cramer, Florence Ballin: 1907-1912, 1947, undated

D'Andrea, Cecelia (Cecil): 1907, 1912, 1921

Dasburg, Margaret: 1908, 1909, 1912, undated

Dasburg, Matilda: 1940

Davidson, Jo: 1906-1910

Davidson, Ray: 1906-1914, 1930, 1932, 1938, 1940-1942, 1951

Davidson, Rose: 1906-1913

de Kerstrat, Yvonne: 1909

Debling, Anna J.: 1909

Denman, George: 1917

Doepel, C. Henry: 1922

Drew, Aline: 1937, undated

Durgy, Caroline R.: 1908

Eberle, A.: 1930

Edson, Helen: 1908

Ennis, C.: 1910

Frankl, Walter H.: 1915, 1918, 1919, undated

Friends Intelligencer -- : 1936

Frost, Chris: 1914

Gardin, Laura: 1908

Geiger, Mary: 1914, 1922

Gilbert, Carl H.: 1927

Harls, E. B.: 1908

Holden, C.: 1950

Howard, Lila Wheelock: 1908-1911, 1914, 1918, 1923, undated

Humphrey, T. F.: 1910

Hunt, Dorothy: 1911

Hunt, Thomas: 1908 (illustrated letter)

Hutchinson, Mary: 1937

Illava, Agatha: 1933

Isler, Jacques: 1933

Jackson, Harrison S.: 1935

Johnson, Alfred: 1907, 1908, 1911, 1914-1916

Johnson, Francis: 1937, 1947

Johnson, Mark: 1904, 1906, 1909, 1918, 1954

Johnson, Van Cleve: 1904, 1908-1918, 1938, 1942, 1947, undated

Kalish Pharmacy: 1910

Kleinert, H.: 1923

Kuhn, Vera Spier: 1908-1912

Labaree, Mary Fleming: 1931

Lane, Mrs. Franklin: 1933

Law, Ellen M.: 1910, 1912, 1922

Lincoln University: 1931

Lucius, Albert: 1922

Lucius, Florence (Floss): 1908-1915, undated

Luhan, Mabel Dodge: 1919, 1924, 1933

Macbeth, William: 1911

Macomb, Edith: 1920

Macrum, Mrs. George: 1947

Magee, R.: 1909, 1910

Martin, Daniel S.: 1891

McFee, Henry Lee: 1912, 1914, undated

McKenzie, Ilya: 1909-1911

Miles, John E.: 1938

Milner, H. W.: 1910

Morgan, Helen: 1907, 1908, 1911, 1912

Morrell, Edith: 1910, 1911, undated

Morton-Morris, Mrs. John: 1946

Mott, Cora E.: 1908

Mott, Jane: 1910

Mott, Laura: 1894, 1906-1908

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: 1935-1937, 1940, undated

National Association of Woment Painters and Sculptors: 1937

The New York News -- : 1935

Noyes, Minnie A.: 1916

Odok, Effiom: 1938

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts: 1913

Pfeiffer, J.: 1912

Potterat, Mathilda: 1910, 1912

Radcliffe, C. M. R.: 1912

Raub, Ida: 1922

Reed, John: 1916

Reynolds, William E.: 1922

Riley, Mary: 1909-1911, undated

Rogers, Julia J.: 1911

Rosenberg, Elfie Cahen: 1904-1912, 1926

Russell, Morgan: 1908

Schlisinger, Gisela: 1907

Schuyler, Josephine: 1933

Scott, Leon W.: 1935

Sholtz, David: 1935

Simkins, Martha: 1913

Simonson, Lee: 1912, 1914-1917, 1928, undated

Smith, S. Archibald: 1920

Spanish and Indian Trading Co.: 1926

Sterling, Lindsey Morris (Sally): 1908-1912

Sutherland, Arthur: 1936-1939

Teague, Cecil: 1911

Teague, Walter: 1911

Wardwell, James: 1909

Watkins, Mary Jane: 1930

Weeks, Henry de F.: 1910

Weigand, Margarith: 1909-1914

White, Mrs. John K.: 1908

Wright, Alice Morgan: 1907, 1908, 1910, 1930

Yaldo, Margaret: 1917-1919
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers, 1833-1980 (bulk 1900-1980). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.dasbandr, Subseries 2.2
See more items in:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-dasbandr-ref136

The Picture Buyer

Title:
William Macbeth
Artist:
John French Sloan, 2 Aug 1871 - 8 Sep 1951  Search this
Sitter:
William Macbeth, 1851 - 1917  Search this
Medium:
Etching
Type:
Print
Date:
1911
Topic:
Home Furnishings\Furniture\Seating\Chair  Search this
Artwork\Painting  Search this
Interior\Art gallery  Search this
William Macbeth: Male  Search this
William Macbeth: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Dealer\Art  Search this
William Macbeth: Visual Arts\Art Collector  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Delaware Art Museum
Website: www.delart.org/
Object number:
DE050068
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_DE050068

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