Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
17 documents - page 1 of 1

Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers

Creator:
Lipman, Howard, 1905-1992  Search this
Names:
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Gaylor, Wood, 1883-1957  Search this
Huge, Jurgan Frederick, 1809-1878  Search this
Lipman, Jean, 1909-1998  Search this
Porter, Rufus, 1792-1884  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Extent:
46.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1848, 1916-2000
Summary:
The Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers measure 46.6 linear feet and span the years 1916 to 2000, with one brochure maintained in a research file dating to 1848. The bulk dates for the collection are 1932 to 1992. The papers primarily concern the art collecting activities and interests of the Lipmans which included modern American sculpture, American folk art, and other contemporary American paintings. Found within the papers are correspondence files, notes and printed material that served as research and reference material, along with financial material. The collection also contains writings, notes, and editorial material used by Jean Lipman in her dual roles as an editor for Art in America magazine and as a respected art critic and author.
Scope and Content Note:
The Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers measure 46.6 linear feet and span the years 1916 to 2000. A copy of an 1848 brochure, retained by Jean Lipman in her research and writings files accounts for the early span date listed in the title of the collection. The bulk dates for the collection are 1932 to 1992. The records include correspondence, notes and printed material that served as research and reference material, along with some financial material that documents the art collecting activities and interests of the Lipmans. The collection also contains writing and editorial material used by Jean Lipman in her dual roles as an editor for Art in America magazine and as a respected author.

The Personal Files describe the social activities and associations of the Lipmans and include biographical information, personal and family correspondence, gift giving activities, the art career of Jean Lipman, and relationships maintained by the Lipmans with various art organizations.

The Howard and Jean Lipman Art Collection Files describe the art collecting activities and interests of the Lipmans throughout their lifetime. The General Files section consists of reference files on art organizations and galleries with whom the Lipmans maintained relationships. Also included are particular topics or exhibitions of interest to the Lipmans. The Sculptors and Painters of Interest section served as reference files about the activities of artists in whom the Lipmans were interested and whose works they owned, or considered owning. The Folk Art Collection section documents the collecting and purchasing activities of the Lipmans as they amassed and then subsequently sold their two significant folk art collections.

The Artists Files document the friendship and projects that developed between the Lipmans and three major American artists: Alexander Calder, Louise Nevelson, and David Smith. Of special interest to researchers will be some original Calder artwork mixed into the correspondence between the Lipmans and Calder, as well as drawings, sketches, prints, and posters found in the associated oversize folder. Also found in the Calder subseries are some proofs from Calder's Circus, edited by Jean Lipman.

The Research and Writing Files is divided into five sections dealing with research and writing projects undertaken by Jean Lipman. The first three sections deal with biographical projects that resulted in books or articles about three significant American primitive artists: Jurgan Frederick Huge, Rufus Porter, and Samuel Wood Gaylor. The fourth section deals with writing projects that resulted in the publication of several generalized books on the topic of American folk art. The final section consists of materials associated with the published articles and other authored works of Jean Lipman on a variety of American art topics.

The Art in America Editorial Files consists of editorial material maintained by Jean Lipman during her tenure (1941-1971) as editor of Art in America. The Financial Files reflect the early financial activities of the magazine during the brief period when the Lipmans owned it.

During the period that Jean Lipman served as editor, a variety of distinguished art historians, artists, architects, novelists, and poets contributed articles, columns, or artwork to the magazine. A sampling of correspondents that can be found in the general correspondence of this series include: Joseph Albers, Marcel DuChamp, John Dos Passos, Nelson Rockefeller, Charles Sheeler, and Andrew Wyeth. The General Correspondence Files also document the two subsequent changes of ownership and the growth of subscribers that occurred during the period of Lipman's editorship.

Editorial material related to individual magazine issues is found within this series, as well as information pertaining to the innovative advertising and special projects undertaken by the magazine as it sought to expand its readership and prestige. The Art in America series also chronicles the changes at the magazine that led to Lipman's resignation as editor in 1971.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as five series. Arrangement is generally alphabetical by subject heading or type of material. Items within folders are arranged chronologically by year.

Series 1: Personal Files (Boxes 1-3; 3 linear ft.)

Series 2: Howard and Jean Lipman Art Collection (Boxes 3-15; 12 linear ft.)

Series 3: Artists Files (Boxes 15-18, 46-47, OV 50-52; 3.6 linear ft.)

Series 4: Research and Writings Files (Boxes 18-28, 48; OV 50, 53; 10.3 linear ft.)

Series 5: -- Art in America -- Editorial Files (Boxes 28-45; 49, OV 50; 17.3 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Howard W. and Jean Lipman shared a lifetime sponsorship of art. The Lipmans' personal art collection, acquired throughout their marriage, was eventually divided into three separate parts: The Howard W. Lipman Foundation collection that was donated and merged into the modern sculpture holdings of the Whitney Museum of American Art; an American folk art collection that was later sold through two separate auctions in 1950 and 1981 and is now part of the holdings of the New York Historical Association and the Museum of American Folk Art; and a personal collection that was retained and displayed in the Lipmans' various residences in Connecticut, New York, and Arizona.

Married in 1933, the Lipmans began jointly collecting American folk art at a time when few art museums or institutions recognized the historical and artistic value of early primitive, self-taught artists. By the late 1940s, the Lipmans had amassed a large, significant collection that was highly regarded for its quality and scope.

During the early 1950s, the Lipmans also began actively collecting sculpture, focusing upon American contemporary sculptors. In the late 1950s they created the Howard W. Lipman Foundation, with an initial inventory of forty sculptures and three paintings by contemporary American artists. The purpose of the foundation was to acquire significant works by emerging American sculptors and to make them available through loans or donations to various art institutions.

In 1965 the Howard W. Lipman Foundation approached the Whitney Museum of American Art with a proposal to coordinate the foundation's efforts and goals with the museum's contemporary sculpture program. The foundation offered a majority of its growing collection of sculpture and acquisition funds towards the development of the evolving permanent collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Thereafter, the Howard W. Lipman Foundation served in an advisory role to the museum's acquisitions, and the foundation supplied the necessary funds to acquire works of sculpture desired by the Whitney for its permanent collection.

In addition to their folk art and foundation collections, the Lipmans also acquired important works by Alexander Calder, Louise Nevelson, and David Smith, through their lifelong association and friendship with these artists. Many of these pieces were retained in the Lipmans' personal collection throughout their lives.

Individually the Lipmans also expressed their interest in art through various means. Jean Lipman served as editor of Art in America magazine from 1940 to 1970, which provided her with continuous exposure to emerging artists and trends in American art. Jean Lipman's abiding interest in folk and contemporary art was also expressed through her voluminous writings. Throughout her life she wrote and edited highly acclaimed books and articles about major themes and artists in American art, and she was a recognized folk art authority and connoisseur. Some of her best known works include: The Flowering of American Folk Art; Rufus Porter, Yankee Wall Painter; and Calder's Universe.

Jean Lipman, born in 1909, was also an amateur artist in her later years, creating paintings and assemblages that often dealt with the theme of "art about art." She was represented by a gallery in New York City, as well as one in Arizona, and she had several solo exhibitions.

Howard W. Lipman, born in 1905, showed an early interest in art. By the mid 1920s he had gone to Paris to study painting, but Lipman found himself more attracted to sculpture and he began studying with a German wood carver. In the late 1930s, after returning to the New York City area, Lipman began stone carving with the Clay Club on Eighth Street, adjacent to the Whitney Museum of American Art. He was represented by a New York City gallery and participated in local exhibitions.

Deciding that his sculptural talent was not sufficient for professional pursuit, Lipman began his business career as a stockbroker in Neuberger and Berman, a prominent New York investment management firm that he helped to establish in 1939. Lipman subsequently channeled his artistic endeavors toward collecting and supporting the work of established and emerging American sculptors. He also served on the boards of both the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Archives of American Art.

Howard and Jean Lipman maintained long and close relationships with three prominent American artists: Alexander Calder, Louise Nevelson, and David Smith. Jean Lipman, in particular, was involved in promoting and documenting Calder and his works through numerous articles, books, and exhibitions that she helped produce as editor of the magazine Art in America and publications director for the Whitney Museum of American Art. Calder's Universe, which she edited to accompany a major Whitney Museum of American Art retrospective exhibition of his works in 1976, was considered by Calder to be his "official" biography. The book went to fourteen printings, one of the largest ever, in the history of art books.

The Lipmans were also great admirers of Louise Nevelson and her work. They purchased her artwork for their own collection, as well as donating pieces to various art museums and institutions. Jean Lipman wrote articles about Nevelson and edited the book, Nevelson's World.

David Smith and the Lipmans established a friendship in the late 1950s that lasted until Smith's untimely death in May 1965. The Lipmans purchased several Smith sculptures, which they placed on the grounds of their Wilton, Connecticut, home. They also purchased Smith works for donation to public institutions, such as the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

The Lipmans retired to Carefree, Arizona, a private residential community renowned for its sensitivity to ecologically-based, architectural design. Howard Lipman died in 1992. Jean Lipman remained active in art and community affairs until her death in 1998.
Provenance:
The papers of Howard and Jean Lipman were initially donated to the Archives of American Art by Howard and Jean Lipman from 1965-1989. Subsequent additions to the original gift were made by Jean Lipman in 1998 and by Peter and Beverly Lipman in 2001. Several small portions of these early accessions were microfilmed.

An associated gift that was originally accessioned as the Art in America Magazine Records was made by Howard and Jean Lipman from 1970-1973. This group, which largely consisted of Jean Lipman's editorial files from her years as editor of the magazine, was subsequently merged with the Howard W. and Jean Lipman records in 2004.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, Primitive  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Folk art -- United States  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Citation:
Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers, 1848, 1916-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lipmhowa
See more items in:
Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lipmhowa
Additional Online Media:

Bernard Harper Friedman papers

Creator:
Friedman, B. H. (Bernard Harper), 1926-2011  Search this
Names:
Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Asher, Elise, 1914-  Search this
Baur, John I. H. (John Ireland Howe), 1909-1987  Search this
Bertoia, Harry  Search this
Biddle, Flora Miller  Search this
Bluhm, Norman, 1921-1999  Search this
Brooks, James, 1906-1992  Search this
Bultman, Fritz, 1919-1985  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Copley, William Nelson, 1919-1996  Search this
Dine, Jim, 1935-  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen, 1928-2011  Search this
Gill, Brendan, 1914-1997  Search this
Goodnough, Robert, 1917-  Search this
Gray, Cleve  Search this
Gray, Francine du Plessix  Search this
Hall, Joellen  Search this
Huebler, Douglas  Search this
Kanovitz, Howard  Search this
Knowlton, Grace, 1932-  Search this
Krasner, Lee, 1908-1984  Search this
Kunitz, Stanley, 1905-2006  Search this
Marca-Relli, Conrad, 1913-2000  Search this
Matter, Mercedes  Search this
McDarrah, Fred W., 1926-2007  Search this
McEwen, Rory, 1932-  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Newman, Arnold, 1918-2006  Search this
Newman, Barnett, 1905-1970  Search this
Norman, Dorothy, 1905-1997  Search this
Ossorio, Alfonso, 1916-1990  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Richenburg, Robert  Search this
Rosset, Barney  Search this
Roth, Philip  Search this
Rothschild, Judith  Search this
Salvesen, Magda  Search this
Sandler, Irving, 1925-  Search this
Scarpitta, Salvatore, 1919-2007  Search this
Schueler, Jon, 1916-  Search this
Simon, Sidney, 1917-1997  Search this
Slivka, David, 1913-  Search this
Still, Clyfford, 1904-1980  Search this
Stout, Myron, 1908-1987  Search this
Interviewee:
Cage, John, 1912-1992  Search this
Correspondent:
Leary, Timothy Francis, 1920-  Search this
Extent:
30.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1926-2011
bulk 1943-2010
Summary:
The papers of writer, art critic and collector Bernard Harper Friedman, 1926-2011, bulk 1943-2010, measure 30.6 linear feet. Extensive professional and personal correspondence, 41 diaries, a large number of his published and unpublished writings, and subject files document Friedman's career as a writer, relationships with cultural institutions and art world figures, and his personal life. Also included are biographical materials, interviews, printed material, 5 scrapbooks and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of writer, art critic and collector Bernard Harper Friedman, 1926-2011, bulk 1943-2010, measure 30.6 linear feet. Extensive professional and personal correspondence, 41 diaries, a large number of his published and unpublished writings, and subject files document Friedman's career as a writer, relationships with cultural institutions and art world figures, and his personal life. Also included are biographical materials, interviews, 5 scrapbooks, and photographs.

Biographical materials include educational records, documentation of Friedman's World War II service in the U.S. Navy, and birth, marriage, and death certificates.

Correspondence is with friends, family, artists, art world figures and institutions, writers, publishers, and literary agents. Among the correspondents are: John I. H. Baur, Harry Bertoia, Flora Biddle, Norman Bluhm, James Brooks, Fritz Bultman, Leo Castelli, William N. Copley, Jim Dine, Helen Frankenthaler, Brendan Gill, Robert Goodnough, Cleve and Francine Gray, Howard Kanovitz, Grace Knowlton, Stanley Kunitz, Conrad Marca-Relli, Mercedes Matter, Fred W. McDarrah, Rory McEwen, Robert Motherwell, Arnold Newman, Barnett Newman, Dorothy Norman, Alfonso Ossorio, Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, Robert Richenburg, Barney Rosset, Philip Roth, Judith Rothschild, Irving Sandler, Salvatore Scarpitta, Jon Schueler, Sidney Simon, David Slivka, Clyfford Still, Myron Stout, Calvin Tompkins, and David Windham.

There are transcripts of interviews with B. H. Friedman, his daughter and wife conducted by the Yale University School of Medicine's "Adult Development Study," and 2 recordings of interviews with Friedman for radio broadcast.

Writings by Friedman include manuscripts of novels, short stories, plays, articles, monographs, and art criticism, some published versions of his work, and a variety of notes. Also found are recordings of lectures by B. H. Friedman and panel discussions in which he participated. Other authors represented are John Cage, W. B. Henry, and Jon Schueler. Friedman's diaries, 1948-1993 (41 volumes) record activities, thoughts, and events.

Subject files compiled by Friedman reflect professional and personal interests, activities, and projects. Many concern publicity for published writings or efforts to find publishers. Especially well documented is his interest in Jackson Pollock, Timothy Leary, and Alfonso Ossorio, and his affiliation with the Whitney Museum of American Art.

The majority of printed material is about or mentions Friedman. Five scrapbooks consist mainly of printed material.

Most photographs are of B. H. and Abby Friedman, their family, and friends. Among the individuals pictured are: Elise Asher, Cary and Norman Bluhm, Sandy Friedman, Joellen Hall, Doug Huebler, Howard Kanowitz, Stanley Kunitz, Lee Krasner, Sheridan Lloyd, Barnett and Annalee Newman, Alfonso Ossorio, Magda Salvesen, Salvatore Scarpitta, John Schueler, and Myron Stout. A photograph album records scenes from a 1979 performance of Whispers, a stage adaptation by Alan Wynroth from Friedman's novel of the same title.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1926-2011 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1946-2011 (Boxes 1-15; 14.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Interviews, 1969-2001 (Box 15; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1940s-2010 (Boxes 16-23; 8 linear feet)

Series 5: Diaries, 1948-1993 (Boxes 24-25; 1.75 linear feet)

Series 6: Subject Files, 1940-2010 (Boxes 25-30; 4.45 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1954-2010 (Box 30-31; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1960-2006 (Boxes 30-32; 0.8 lilnear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1950s-2008 (Box 30; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Bernard Harper Friedman (1926-2011), a writer best known as the author of the first biography of Jackson Pollock, was also an art critic and art collector involved in the cultural life of New York City.

Bernard Harper Friedman, known professionally as B. H. Friedman, was called Bob by family and friends. After interrupting his studies at Cornell University to serve in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he graduated in 1948 with a degree in English. Friedman and his new bride, fellow student Abby G. Noselson (1926-2003), returned home to New York City and he began a real estate career in his uncles' firm, Uris Buildings Corporation. While a businessman, Friedman spent much of his spare time writing. He produced fiction, plays, and criticism; Friedman's articles on art, literature and music appeared in a wide variety of periodicals. During this period, Friedman also pursued his interests in jazz, collecting abstract art, and psychedelic drug experiences with Timothy Leary.

His first published novel, Circles, about the Abstract Expressionist milieu, appeared in 1962. A year later, B. H. Friedman became a full-time writer. For nearly 20 years, he divided his time between New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts, where he was affiliated with the Fine Arts Work Center as a director and consultant. During this period, he published several novels and two biographies: Jackson Pollock: Energy Made Visible and Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, written with Flora Biddle. More novels and short story collections were published, and staged readings of seven plays were presented between 1987 and 2007. Tripping, a memoir of using psychedlics with Timothy Leary, appeared in 2006.

A founding member of Fiction Collective, a nonprofit publishing group run by and for writers, Friedman was also a member of several national writers' organizations. He served as a trustee of the Whitney Musuem of American Art, 1961-1968, and then as honorary trustee. B. H. Friedman died from complications of pneumonia on January 4, 2011 in New York City.
Related Materials:
Also available is an oral history interview with Bernard Harper Friedman, 1972 November 10, conducted by Paul Cummings for the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
The Bernard Harper Friedman papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2012 by his daughter, Daisy Friedman.
Restrictions:
The collection is ACCESS RESTRICTED; written permission is required. Use of original materials requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Bernard Harper Friedman papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. They may be used for research, study, and scholarship. Access requires written permission.
Topic:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Bernard Harper Friedman papers, 1926-2011, bulk 1943-2010. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.friebern
See more items in:
Bernard Harper Friedman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-friebern

Joseph F. McCrindle papers

Creator:
McCrindle, Joseph F.  Search this
Names:
Henfield Foundation  Search this
Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation  Search this
Benedict, Pinckney, 1964-  Search this
DuBourg, Antoine  Search this
Feder, Edith Mosler  Search this
Feder, Joseph Fuller  Search this
Levey, Michael  Search this
Lowe, John  Search this
Moffett, Odette Feder  Search this
Sewell, Brian  Search this
Extent:
5.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Blueprints
Photographs
Date:
1877-2013
Summary:
The papers of New York art collector and philanthropist, Joseph F. McCrindle, measure 5.3 linear feet and date from 1877-2013. The collection documents McCrindle's art collecting, art donations, philanthropy, family affairs, and personal estate. Found are extensive art inventories, sales receipts, gift and loan documentation, and photographs of artwork. The papers also include Joseph McCrindle's estate records and wills, family papers, records from the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation, correspondence with museums and galleries, and photographs of McCrindle and family members.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York art collector and philanthropist, Joseph F. McCrindle, measure 5.3 linear feet and date from 1877-2013. The collection documents McCrindle's art collecting, art donations, philanthropy, family affairs, and personal estate. Found are extensive art inventories, sales receipts, gift and loan documentation, and photographs of artwork. The papers also include Joseph McCrindle's estate records and wills, family papers, records from the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation, correspondence with museums and galleries, and photographs of McCrindle and family members.

Biographical and family materials include McCrindle's obituary, copies of printed programs from his memorial service, and legal documents dealing with his will. There are papers dealing with his grandparents, Joseph Fuller Feder and Edith Mosler Feder, his mother, Odette Feder Moffett, and blueprints and paperwork for his grandfather's yacht, the M.Y. Kihna.

Materials from the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation include the certificate of incorporation for the Henfield Foundation, change of name documentation to rename it the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation, by-laws for the organization, waiver notices for special called meetings, minutes for annual and special meetings, financial statements, and gift lists. McCrindle corresponded heavily with various museums and galleries. Also found are letters from family, friends, and colleagues, such as Michael Levey, Brian Sewell, and Pinckney Benedict. Legal correspondence concerns McCrindle's estate. Sympathy and condolences are addressed to John Rowe on the occasion of Joseph McCrindle's death.

Personal business records concern McCrindle's art collection, sales, bequests, and his estate. The art collection is documented in extensive art inventories and lists, most of which is found in two large dismantled notebooks. Sales receipts are also found for McCrindles purchases as early as 1942. There are artwork appraisals, and documentation of McCrindle's gifts and loans of artwork to museums and galleries. There are early receipts and invoices for rare books, decorative items, antiques, and artwork purchases by Joseph and Edith Feder, McCrindle's grandparents.

Printed material includes a copy of the text, Old Master Drawings from the Collection of Joseph F. McCrindle, donor reports, exhibition catalogs, clippings, assorted bulletins and newsletters, and programs from live performances.

Loose photographs are of Joseph McCrindle, from early childhood through adulthood. There are also photographs of his family, including his grandparents, Joseph and Edith Feder, his mother, Odette Feder Moffett, and his half brother, Antoine DuBourg. There are photo albums containing images of McCrindle as a child; of his mother as a child; family and travel photographs; and photographs taken during cruises on the family yacht, M.Y. Kihna. Three of the albums are dedicated to Kihna travels.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into six series:

Series 1: Biographical and Family Material, 1913-2008 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1, OV 9)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1946-2012 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, circa 1919-2010 (2.0 linear feet; Box 1-3)

Series 4: Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation Records, 1958-2012 (0.3 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1899-2013 (0.4 linear feet; Box 4)

Series 6: Photographic Material, 1877-2006 (1.8 linear feet; Box 4-6)
Biographical / Historical:
Lifelong resident of New York City, Joseph Feder McCrindle (1923-2008) was a collector, art patron, publisher, and philanthropist. He founded the Transatlantic Review and The Henfield Foundation.

Born to John Ronald McCrindle and Odette Feder McCrindle on March 27, 1923, Joseph McCrindle was exposed to art appreciation at an early age. After his parents were divorced in 1924 and his mother remarried in 1928, he was raised primarily by his grandparents, Joseph F. Feder and Edith Mosler Feder. Summers were spent abroad in Europe, courtesy of the family yacht, where he developed his knowledge of art history and studied foreign languages.

McCrindle attended the St. Paul's School in Manhattan, followed by Harvard University, graduating in 1944. During World War II, McCrindle served with the Office of Strategic Services in London, where he attained the rank of first lieutenant. He went on to receive a law degree from Yale University in 1948.

After working briefly in the publishing world, McCrindle became a literary agent. In 1959, he started the Transatlantic Review, a London-based literary journal. He remained in place as editor and publisher until the company closed in 1977.

The Henfield Foundation, now known as the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation, was established by McCrindle in 1958 to provide grants to organizations focused on the development of art, music, and social justice.

Joseph McCrindle was a notable art collector and donated and loaned many works of art to museums and galleries. McCrindle amassed 2,500 old master drawings in his lifetime, in addition to Italian baroque paintings, 19th-century drawings, British artwork, and more . Some examples of gifts and loans documented in the McCrindle papers include an extended a loan of John Singer Sargent's Landscape With Two Women in Foreground to the Yale Center for British Art in 1982, Salvator Rosa's The Torment of Tityus to the Museum and Art Gallery of Stanford University in 1992, and Luca Giordano's Saint Barnabas to the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco in 2002.

Joseph McCrindle died on July 11, 2008. His collection was bequeathed to a number of institutions across the nation, such as the Brooklyn Museum, the National Gallery of Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Related Materials:
The bulk of Joseph F. McCrindle's papers are housed at Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library.
Provenance:
The Joseph F. McCrindle papers were donated in 2012-2013 by Joseph F. McCrindle via John Rowe, president and CEO of the Joseph F. McCrindle Foundation.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Joseph F. McCrindle papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Philanthropists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Blueprints
Photographs
Citation:
Joseph F. McCrindle Papers, 1877-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccrjose
See more items in:
Joseph F. McCrindle papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mccrjose
Additional Online Media:

John Gellatly letters received from artists

Creator:
Gellatly, John, 1853-1931  Search this
Names:
Barnard, George Grey, 1863-1938  Search this
Church, Frederick S. (Frederick Stuart), 1842-1924  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham, 1847-1917  Search this
Thayer, Abbott Handerson, 1849-1921  Search this
Thayer, Emma B., 1850-1924  Search this
Wiles, Irving Ramsay, 1861-1948  Search this
Wood, Charles Erskine Scott, 1852-1944  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Illustrated letters
Date:
1887-1931
Summary:
The John Gellatly letters received from artists measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1887 to 1931. Found within the collection are 120 letters to Gellatly from Emma and Abbott H. Thayer, Frederick S. Church, Irving Wiles, Albert Pinkham Ryder, C. E. S. Wood, and George Grey Barnard. Some of the letters contain sketches, particularly those from Church. Topics include the price and progress of artworks, requests for commissions, mutual friendships, and daily events. There are also two copies of the poem "The Flying Dutchman" by Albert P. Ryder.
Scope and Contents:
The John Gellatly letters received from artists measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1887 to 1931. Found within the collection are 120 letters to Gellatly from Emma and Abbott H. Thayer, Frederick S. Church, Irving Wiles, Albert Pinkham Ryder, C. E. S. Wood, and George Grey Barnard. Some of the letters contain sketches, particularly those from Church. Topics include the price and progress of artworks, requests for commissions, mutual friendships, and daily events. There are also two copies of the poem "The Flying Dutchman" by Albert P. Ryder.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 1 series.

Series 1: John Gellatly Letters Received from Artists, 1887-1931 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)
Biographical / Historical:
Art collector John Gellatly (1853-1931) lived in New York City, N.Y. and established a real estate and insurance business in 1885. An art enthusiast, Gellatly furthered his interests by enrolling in classes. There, he would meet his future wife, the heiress Edith Rogers, whom he married in 1886. Together, they began collecting decorative art objects and contemporary paintings, including works by Albert P. Ryder, Abbott Thayer, and Childe Hassam. After Edith's death in 1917, Gellatly continued to collect art and eventually gifted the 1,640 objects and paintings in his collection to the Smithsonian in 1929. He died of complications from pneumonia in 1931.
Provenance:
The collection was initially bought by art historian Thomas Brumbaugh of Vanderbilt University from Walter R. Benjamin Autographs of Madison Avenue, and subsequently acquired in 1978 by the National Collection of Fine Arts, now the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Shortly thereafter, the letters were transferred to the Archives of American Art.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The John Gellatly letters received from artists are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Illustrated letters
Citation:
John Gellatly letters received from artists, 1887-1931. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.gelljohn
See more items in:
John Gellatly letters received from artists
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gelljohn
Additional Online Media:

Lloyd Goodrich papers

Creator:
Goodrich, Lloyd, 1897-1987  Search this
Names:
American Art Research Council  Search this
American Federation of Arts  Search this
Artist Tenants Association (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists Equity Association  Search this
Association of Art Museum Directors  Search this
National Council on the Arts and Government  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Dows, Olin, 1904-1981  Search this
Eakins, Thomas, 1844-1916  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Homer, Winslow, 1836-1910  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes, 1876-1952  Search this
Newman, Elias, 1903-  Search this
Rich, Daniel Catton, 1904-1976  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham, 1847-1917  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987  Search this
Extent:
35.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Transcripts
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Date:
1884-1987
bulk 1927-1987
Summary:
The papers of art historian, writer, and museum administrator Lloyd Goodrich measure 35.7 linear feet and date from 1884 to 1987 with the bulk of the material dating from 1927 to 1987. Materials include biographical material, extensive correspondence, writings and research files, organization and committee files, exhibition files, printed material, a scrapbook, and photographic material. The collection is particularly rich in research files on Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, Albert Pinkham Ryder, and Reginald Marsh, as well as correspondence with additional notable artists and art figures.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian, writer, and museum administrator Lloyd Goodrich measure 35.7 linear feet and date from 1884 to 1987 with the bulk of the material dating from 1927 to 1987. Materials include biographical material, extensive correspondence, writings and research files, organization and committee files, exhibition files, printed material, a scrapbook, and photographic material. The collection is particularly rich in research files on Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, Albert Pinkham Ryder, and Reginald Marsh, as well as correspondence with additional notable artists and art figures.

Scattered biographical materials include biographical sketches, an interview transcript, personal business records, documents relating to Goodrich's service on art juries, and awards and honors.

Correspondence is with friends, family, artists, museums, collectors, galleries, and arts organizations. Correspondents include The Arts Magazine, Whitney Museum of Art, Olin Dows, Philip Evergood, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Reginald Marsh, Kenneth Hayes Miller, Elias Newman, Daniel Catton Rich, and Raphael Soyer among many others. Research related correspondence arranged here concerns work on a catalogue raisonné of Winslow Homer. This material was originally arranged in the correspondence files by Goodrich prior to the later donation that included additional research files on Homer found in Series 3. There are also condolence letters from notable figures in American art.

Writings and research files include major writings, such as books and articles, and book reviews, essays, exhibition text, catalog entries, and lectures. In addition to the writings, Goodrich's research files for the writings are arranged here and include research, notes, correspondence, photographs, illustrations, printed materials, and bibliographies. There are also book agreements. There are extensive files for Goodrich's books on Winslow Homer (see also correspondence in Series 2) and Reginald Marsh; articles, catalog entries, and other writings on Winslow Homer, Albert Pinkham Ryder, Kuniyoshi, Reginald Marsh, and American art in general; lectures and talks; research files on other artists, and notes and notebooks.

Organization and committee files document Goodrich's service on boards, commissions, committees, organizations, and associations, such as the American Federation of Arts, the Association of Art Museum Directors, the Carnegie Study in American Art, the National Council on the Arts and Government, American Art Research Council, Artists Equity Association, Artist Tenants Association, the selection committee of the American National Exhibition (1959), and others are found within organization and committee files. Agendas, correspondence, meeting minutes, and printed material are found within the files.

Exhibition files are found only for several Winslow Homer shows. Printed materials include clippings, publicity materials, and printed copies of his writings. Photographic material includes scattered photographs of Goodrich and others, and extensive negatives of works of art, likely by Homer. Also found are x-rays of paintings by Ralph Blakelock.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1946-1984 (Boxes 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1920-1987 (Boxes 1-3; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Research Files, 1884-1987 (Boxes 3-17, 38; 14.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Organization and Committee files, 1933-1982 (Boxes 17-31, 37; 14.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1944-1986 (Boxes 31-32; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, circa 1920s-1979 (Boxes 32-33; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 7: Scrapbook, 1952-1959 (Box 33; 2 folders)

Series 8: Photographic Materials, circa 1910-1987 (Boxes 33-37; 3.1 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Lloyd Goodrich (1897-1987) was a prominent and influential art historian, writer, and director of the Whitney Museum of Art in New York City, New York, from 1958-1968.

Lloyd Goodrich was born in Nutley, New Jersey in 1897. He studied under Kenneth Hayes Miller at the Art Students League from 1913-1915 and also took courses at the National Academy of Design. Rather than pursue a career as an artist, however, he decided that his real talent was writing about art. He began his long and prolific writing career in 1923-24 and married Edith Havens in 1924. Inspired by the work and writings of European art scholars and a desire to address the need for a body of scholarship on American Art, Goodrich began to research and write about American artists Kenneth Hayes Miller, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Eakins.

Goodrich's first article on Winslow Homer was published in 1924 by The Arts, a magazine financed by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney and edited by Forbes Watson, who soon hired Goodrich as associate editor. By 1929, Goodrich was also working as assistant art critic for the New York Times while continuing work at The Arts as contributing editor. One year later, The Arts commissioned Goodrich to write a book on Kenneth Hayes Miller. And, around the same time Goodrich became interested in Thomas Eakins, and with the encouragement and financial support from his boyhood friend, artist Reginald Marsh, he began work on a monograph about Eakins.

In 1930, Goodrich joined the staff of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney's new American art museum in New York City, the Whitney Museum of American Art. The museum provided him with the funds he needed to research and complete his book on Thomas Eakins, which he achieved in 1933. In 1935, he became curator of the museum, and associate director in 1948. He served as director from 1958-1968. The bequest of the Edward Hopper collection to the Whitney was the result of Goodrich's reputation as a scholar of Edward Hopper. After retiring, Goodrich continued his association with the Whitney as advisory director and director emeritus.

Goodrich was instrumental in starting the American Art Research Council in 1942, a group of museums devoted to collecting scholarly records about American art. He sat on the advisory panels for the New York State Council on the Arts and the Fine Arts Advisory Committee to the White House. In 1933, he was in charge of the New York regional office of the Public Works of Art Project. He also served as chairman of the National Council on the Arts and Government from 1948 to 1954 and was a major force in the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts and Humanities. He was a member of the Artists Equity Association, Artist Tenants Association, and numerous other arts organizations and a strong advocate for the promotion and support of American art and artists.

Throughout his long and distinguished career as a writer and museum administrator, Lloyd Goodrich worked to build a body of scholarship related to the history of American art and artists. He published several important monographs, including works on Thomas Eakins, Edward Hopper, Albert Pinkham Ryder, Winslow Homer, and Reginald Marsh, and organized major exhibitions about these and many other artists during his 57-year association with the Whitney Museum of American Art. At the time of his death, Goodrich was considered a preeminent figure in the American art world, and one of the foremost authorities on Eakins, Ryder, and Homer, artists on which he kept extensive research files throughout his life.

Lloyd Goodrich died March 27, 1987.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Lloyd Goodrich, 1962-1963 by Harlan Phillips for the Archives of American Art.

Additional Lloyd Goodrich papers are located at the Whitney Museum of American Art Archives, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reel 4468) including a photocopy of the manuscript "Albert Pinkham Ryder: The Man and His Art," Goodrich's contribution to the book "Albert Pinkham Ryder: Painter of Dreams" co-authored with William I. Homer. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The Lloyd Goodrich papers were given to the Archives of American Art in several different acquisitions. Lloyd Goodrich first donated material in 1983. David Goodrich, Lloyd Goodrich's son, gave more material between 1988 and 2007 while additional papers were lent for microfilming by William I. Homer in 1990. Finally, the Whitney Museum of American Art donated papers in 1996, and Polly Thistlethwaite gave further material in 2015.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Lloyd Goodrich papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Museum curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Museum administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art museums -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Museum directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Transcripts
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Lloyd Goodrich papers, 1884-1987, bulk 1927-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.goodlloy
See more items in:
Lloyd Goodrich papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goodlloy
Additional Online Media:

Victor D. Spark papers

Creator:
Spark, Victor D. (Victor David), 1898-1991  Search this
Names:
San Diego Arts Society  Search this
Berliner, Jacob, 1849-1918  Search this
Clonney, James Goodwyn, 1812-1867  Search this
Copley, John Singleton, 1738-1815  Search this
Engelhard, Charles W., Jr., 1917-1971  Search this
Frankenstein, Alfred V. (Alfred Victor), 1906-1981  Search this
Grigaut, Hubert L.  Search this
Hardy, Charlotte  Search this
Hardy, Jeremiah Pearson, 1800-1889  Search this
Heade, Martin Johnson, 1819-1904  Search this
Lehman, Robert, 1892-1969  Search this
Medina, Leon  Search this
Moran, Ruth B.  Search this
Moran, Thomas, 1837-1926  Search this
Peale, Rembrandt, 1778-1860  Search this
Prendergast, Maurice Brazil, 1858-1924  Search this
Shinn, Everett, 1876-1953  Search this
Sully, Thomas, 1783-1872  Search this
Extent:
22.2 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Date:
circa 1830-1983
bulk 1930-1970
Summary:
The Victor D. Spark papers measure 22.2 linear feet and date from circa 1830 to 1983, with the bulk of the material from 1930 to 1970. The papers document Spark's career as a New York City art dealer and appraiser who was most active from World War II through the 1970s, focusing on Old Masters paintings and 19th and early 20th century American art. Found within the papers are biographical materials, artist files, client files, financial records, legal records, printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The Victor D. Spark papers measure 22.2 linear feet and date from circa 1830 to 1983, with the bulk of the material from 1930 to 1970. The papers document Spark's career as a New York City art dealer and appraiser who was most active during World War II up through the 1970s with a focus on Old Masters paintings as well as 19th and early 20th century American art. Found within the papers are biographical materials, artist files, client files, financial records, legal records, printed material, and photographs.

Biographical materials contain greeting cards and post cards, annotated appointment calendars, miscellaneous notes and lists, and an apartment lease.

Artists' files include photographs of artwork, artist biographies, printed materials, and some correspondence with and about the artist. Many of the photographs are annotated. Files are found for Old Masters and American artists, including James G. Clonney, Jon Singleton Copley, Jeremiah P. Hardy, Martin Johnson Heade, Rembrandt Peale, Maurice Prendergast, Everett Shinn, Thomas Sully, and many others. There is also a letter written in 1924 by Ruth Moran along with a photograph of a painting by the artist Thomas Moran, signed by him on the verso.

Extensive client files include notes, correspondence, bills, receipts, and clippings regarding sales and appraisals. Spark's clients included museums, collectors, art dealers, most of which are represented in the files. Notable clients and colleagues include Jacob S. Berliner, Charles W. Engelhard, Alfred V. Frankenstein, Hubert L. Grigaut, Charlotte W. Hardy, Robert Lehman, and Leon Medina. There are also files for many universities, businesses, museums, and galleries.

Financial records comprise the largest series in the collection and include ledgers, stock books, consignment records, scattered banking records, bills, tax documents, auction price lists, check stubs, and cancelled checks.

A small amount of legal records document two legal cases: Rauch v. IRS and Kaufman v. Phoenix (Travelers) Insurance Company for which Spark provided testimony.

Printed materials include clippings, exhibition and auction catalogs, newsletters, bulletins, a membership roster for the San Diego Arts Society, and several 19th century printed items.

Two black and white photographs are of a steam locomotive and an unidentified portraitist in his studio.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1906, 1948-1981 (1.7 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 2: Artist Files, 1905-1983 (4 linear feet; Box 2-6, 22)

Series 3: Client Files, 1904, 1927-1981 (7.1 linear feet; Box 6-13)

Series 4: Financial Records, 1930-1981 (8.7 linear feet; Box 13-20, 22-29)

Series 5: Legal Records, 1970-1972 (0.2 linear feet; Box 20)

Series 6: Printed Materials, circa 1830-1872, 1948-1982 (0.2 linear feet; Box 20-22)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1898-circa 1940 (0.1 linear feet; Box 21)
Biographical / Historical:
Victor D. Spark (1898-1991) was a prominent New York City appraiser and art dealer who specialized in Old Masters paintings as well as 19th and early 20th century art.

Spark was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1898. When he was two years old, the Spark family moved to Harlem. His father worked in the hotel business and owned hotels in Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Europe. Spark briefly attended the City College of New York before transferring to New York University, where he studied for half a year, then enlisted in the Marines Corps during World War I and served overseas for 2 years. After his discharge, Spark returned to NYU where he majored in French, an interest he acquired during his military service. After graduation, Spark married Nina and went to Europe to help his father manage a summer hotel. There, he became interested in art.

Spark returned to the U.S., continuing to work for his father until 1929. Spark was involved with decorating and furnishing the hotels and often purchased antiques, artwork, and furniture, furthering his arts interests and knowledge. He began working in a gallery, acquiring works of art and dividing the sales profits with the gallery owners. Spark had no formal art education and his taste and eye for art was gained primarily through his travels in Europe. He also had a good business sense about what might sell for profit in the U.S.

Spark made frequent art buying trips across the United States to cities such as Boston and Philadelphia and returned to New York with paintings that he sold. Spark never owned a gallery, but he occasionally held exhibits, such as one titled "101 American Painters," inside the apartment. Although Spark specialized in 19th to early 20th century American art, he also sold European art work acquired during trips to Europe following World War II.

Spark continued his work selling paintings to museums, collectors, and other art dealers, until the 1970s. He was most active from the 1930s through World War II. As a prominent dealer for over four decades, Spark came to know many luminaries of the New York art scene, such as art dealer and gallery owner Edith Halpert. Spark died in 1991.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds an oral history interview of Victor D. Spark conducted August 5, 1975 by Paul Cummings.

The National Gallery of Art maintains 12,000 photographs and negatives of artwork in their Victor D. Spark photograph collection.
Provenance:
The Victor D. Spark papers were acquired between 1954 and 1996. The first accession of 19th century printed materials and a letter by Ruth Moran was donated by Spark in 1954. The bulk of the collection was purchased jointly by the Archives of American Art and the National Gallery of Art at auction in July 1987. Subsequently, photographs of works of art documenting the collections of the National Gallery of Art were separated and retained by the National Gallery of Art. The papers remained at the Archives of American Art; three letters were later transferred to the Archives from the National Gallery of Art in 1996.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Victor D. Spark papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Art appraisers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Art, Modern -- 19th century -- United States  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Victor D. Spark papers, circa 1830-1983, bulk 1930-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sparvict
See more items in:
Victor D. Spark papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sparvict
Additional Online Media:

Henry and Rose Pearlman papers

Creator:
Pearlman, Henry, b. 1895  Search this
Names:
The Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Degas, Edgar, 1834-1917  Search this
Gogh, Vincent van, 1853-1890  Search this
Kokoschka, Oskar, 1886-  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Modigliani, Amedeo, 1884-1920  Search this
Pearlman, Rose, b. 1901  Search this
Soutine, Chaim, 1893-1943  Search this
Extent:
4.38 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Date:
1893-1995
bulk 1950-1980
Summary:
The records of the Henry and Rose Pearlman papers measure 4.38 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1995 (bulk 1950-1980). The collection documents the activities of Post-Impressionist and Modern art collectors Henry and Rose Pearlman through correspondence, research materials, exhibition catalogs, photographs, and clippings.
Scope and Content Note:
The Henry and Rose Pearlman papers measure 4.38 linear feet and document the activities of art collectors Henry and Rose Pearlman through correspondence, research materials, exhibition catalogs, photographs of artwork and exhibitions, and clippings ranging from 1909 to 1995 (bulk 1950-1980). Most of the materials relate to artists and pieces represented in the Pearlmans' collection, although a small amount of material concerns works considered or researched by Pearlman, but not purchased.

The bulk of the collection concerns the lending, reproduction, and exhibition of works of art owned by the Pearlmans and their foundation. Supplemental research material such as exhibition catalogs, photographs of artworks, and articles and clippings on artists, artworks or other private collections, make up most of the remainder. Oversized materials include a catalogue of the Pearlman Collection, a portfolio of reproductions of the Cezanne watercolors belonging to the Pearlmans, and photographs comparing Toulouse-Lautrec's Parody of the Bois Sacre aux Arts et Muses to the original.
Arrangement:
The collection has been arranged into four series. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.

Series 1: General Collection Files, 1950-1995 (Box 1, 5; 8 folders)

Series 2: Artists' Files, 1909-1995 (Boxes 1-5, MGP 5; 3.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Museum Files, 1951-1994 (Box 4; 20 folders)

Series 4: Personal Files, 1966-1993 (Box 4; 5 folders)
Biographical Note:
Henry Pearlman (1895-1974), a lifelong resident of New York City, rose through the ranks of the business world to found his own company, Eastern Cold Storage, in 1919. In 1925, Henry married Rose. In the early 1940s, Pearlman purchased a few realist paintings, but it wasn't until his 1943 purchase of Chaim Soutine's Village Square that he was inspired to build what would become a noted collection of Post-Impressionist works. Over the next three decades, Pearlman acquired numerous works by such well-known artists as Soutine, Modigliani, Cezanne, Van Gogh, Renoir, Manet, Matisse, and Toulouse-Lautrec, in addition to those of lesser-known artists. In the early 1950s, Pearlman began collecting Cezanne watercolors. These paintings would become the cornerstone of his collection and would be exhibited around the world. Pearlman died in 1974, leaving his wife, Rose, to manage his collection until her death in 1994. From the mid-1970s, the Pearlman Collection has been on long-term loan to the Art Museum of Princeton.

The Pearlmans founded the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation in the 1950s. Much of the Pearlmans' artwork is now officially owned by the Foundation.
Provenance:
The Henry and Rose Pearlman papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2004 by Dorothy Edelman and Marge Scheuer, daughters of Henry and Rose Pearlman, care of the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Henry and Rose Pearlman papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Henry and Rose Pearlman papers, 1893-1995, bulk 1950-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.pearhenr
See more items in:
Henry and Rose Pearlman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pearhenr
Additional Online Media:

Samuel J. Wagstaff papers

Creator:
Wagstaff, Samuel J.  Search this
Names:
Basen, Dan, 1939-  Search this
Brecht, George  Search this
Byars, James Lee  Search this
De Maria, Walter, 1935-2013  Search this
Di Suvero, Mark, 1933-  Search this
Fine, Albert M.  Search this
Flavin, Dan, 1933-  Search this
Halprin, Anna  Search this
Hartigan, Grace  Search this
James, Charles, d. 1978  Search this
Johnson, Philip, 1906-2005  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Manning, Doreen  Search this
Manning, Robert  Search this
Martin, Agnes, 1912-2004  Search this
Newton, Gordon, 1948-  Search this
Oldenburg, Claes, 1929-  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Roth, Dieter, 1930-1998  Search this
Saret, Alan, 1944-  Search this
Tuttle, Richard, 1941-  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-  Search this
Wilson, Mary F.  Search this
Extent:
6.4 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
circa 1932-1985
Summary:
The Samuel J. Wagstaff papers, circa 1932-1985 comprise 6.4 linear feet of correspondence, writings, miscellaneous records, printed material, and photographs documenting Wagstaff's professional and personal relationships with artists and photographers, his career as an art curator, and his position as an important collector of paintings and photographs. Correspondence with artists and others such as curators, arts organizations, galleries, and museums, reflects the diversity of contemporary American art and includes individuals associated with the abstract expressionist, Fluxus, pop, earth, conceptual, and minimalist art movements.
Scope and Content Note:
The Samuel J. Wagstaff papers, circa 1932-1985, comprise 6.4 linear feet of correspondence, writings, miscellaneous records, printed material, and photographs documenting Wagstaff's professional and personal relationships with artists and photographers, his career as an art curator, and his position as an important collector of paintings and photographs.

Correspondence with artists and others such as curators, arts organizations, galleries, and museums reflects the diversity of contemporary American art and includes individuals associated with the abstract expressionist, Fluxus, pop, earth, conceptual, and minimalist art movements. Wagstaff's importance as a collector and curator and his generosity to and interest in artists is evident from the large number of invitations to view and critique work, requests for fellowship and grant recommendations, and thank you notes from artists to whom he extended financial or moral support. Among the most prolific correspondents found here are: Dan Basen, George Brecht, James Lee Byars, Walter de Maria, Mark Di Suvero, Albert Fine, Dan Flavin, Ann Halprin, Grace Hartigan, Charles James, Philip Johnson, Ray Johnson, Doreen and Robert Manning, Agnes Martin, Gordon Newton, Claes Oldenburg, Ad Reinhardt, Dieter Rot, Alan Saret, Richard Tuttle, May Wilson, and Andy Warhol.

Writings by Wagstaff consist of "Looking at Modern Art" prepared for the Trinity College Reading Program, and an untitled, undated piece about multiplicity in art. Among the writings by other authors are Bruce Bennard's "The Photographer Rediscovered," "Pop Art" by Henry Geldzahler, and "Collecting Photographs" by Bonnie Barrett Stretch.

Miscellaneous records are drawings by Bruce Kleinsmith, a print by Harold Paris and artists' resumes. Also included is a costume consisting of a stuffed devil's tail and two red silk caps connected by a long sash, all in a matching red silk bag.

Among the printed material are books, exhibition catalogs and prospectuses, periodicals, press releases, reproductions, and a variety of other printed items relating to photography and art.

Photographs consist largely of copy prints and a small number of original prints. Also included are a few images of exhibition installations and other miscellaneous subjects. There are no portraits of Samuel J. Wagstaff among the photographs of people. Identified individuals include: Bella Abzug, Peter Allen, Michael Collins, Angela Davis, Candy Darling, Wendell Ford, Joseph Hirshhorn, W. A. Huffman, David Love, Marc Miller, Bettie Ringma, and Andy Warhol.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 5 series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1932-1986 (Boxes 1-3, 8, OV 9-10; 2.5 linear ft.)

Series 2: Writings, 1961-1983 (Box 3; 0.2 linear ft.)

Series 3: Miscellaneous Papers and Artifacts, 1970s-1980s (Box 3; 0.2 linear ft.)

Series 4: Printed Material, circa 1914-1988 (Boxes 3-8, OV 11; 3.2 linear ft.)

Series 5: Photographs, 1975-1982 (Boxes 7-8; 0.1 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Samuel J. Wagstaff, Jr. (1921-1987), the son of a lawyer from an old New York family and fashion artist Olga Piorkowska, was born in New York City. A graduate of Yale University, he was an ensign in the Navy and took part in the D-day landing at Omaha Beach.

Following World War II, Wagstaff studied Renaissance art at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. A David E. Finley art history fellowship took him to the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C. in 1959. He served as curator of contemporary art at the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Conn., from 1961 to 1968, where he coordinated sculptor Tony Smith's first museum show in 1966. In 1971, during Wagstaff's tenure as curator at the Detroit Institute of Arts (1968-1971), he presented Michael Heizer's installation Dragged Mass Geometric on the grounds of the museum.

In addition to his curatorial work, Samuel J. Wagstaff was a noted collector. Originally, he was a fairly influential collector of avant-garde paintings. After seeing the exhibition "The Painterly Photograph" and meeting photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, Wagstaff became convinced that photographs were the most unrecognized and, possibly, the most valuable works of art. He moved to New York and began selling his collection of paintings, using the proceeds to begin his photography collection and concentrating on 19th century American, British, and French examples. Then, influenced by his lover, photographer Mapplethorpe, Wagstaff's taste veered toward the daring, and he began to depart from established names in search of new talent. His collection was soon recognized as one of the finest private holdings in the United States. An exhibition of his photographs was organized by the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C., in 1978, and A Book of Photographs from the Sam Wagstaff Collection was published to accompany the show that toured the country.

The photograph collection was sold to the J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, Calif., in 1984, for a reported $5 million. Wagstaff then focused his attention on collecting 19th century American silver, and a selection from that collection was exhibited at the New York Historical Society in 1987.

Samuel J. Wagstaff died in New York City on January 14, 1987, from pneumonia, a complication of HIV infection.
Provenance:
Samuel J. Wagstaff donated his papers between 1976 and 1986.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Samuel J. Wagstaff papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Photography  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Photographs -- Collectors and collecting -- United States  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, Modern  Search this
Fluxus (Group of artists)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
Samuel J. Wagstaff papers, circa 1932-1985. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.wagssamu
See more items in:
Samuel J. Wagstaff papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wagssamu
Additional Online Media:

Raymond and Margaret Horowitz papers

Creator:
Horowitz, Raymond J., 1916-2005  Search this
Names:
Adelson Galleries  Search this
Babcock Galleries  Search this
Hirschl & Adler Galleries  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
National Gallery of Art (U.S.)  Search this
Fraad, Daniel  Search this
Horowitz, Margaret, 1915-2005  Search this
Magriel, Paul David, 1906-  Search this
Spark, Victor D. (Victor David), 1898-1991  Search this
Extent:
5.4 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Date:
1903-2007
bulk 1960-2007
Summary:
The papers of collectors Raymond and Margaret Horowitz measure 5.4 linear feet and date from 1903-2007, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960- 2007. The collection documents the Horowitzes' activities as collectors through art collection files, including appraisals, sales information, printed material, and photographs of artwork; files of artwork sold or donated; accession records, including inventory lists of paintings and prints; and catalog information.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of collectors Raymond and Margaret Horowitz measure 5.4 linear feet and date from 1903-2007, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960- 2007. The collection documents the Horowitzes' activities as collectors through art collection files, including appraisals, sales information, printed material, and photographs of artwork; files of artwork sold or donated; accession records, including inventory lists of paintings and prints; and catalog information.

The records document the acquisitions that formed the foundation for the Raymond and Margaret Horowitz collection. Materials reflect Raymond Horowitz's long-standing relationships with dealers, galleries, and museums, including Adelson Galleries, Babcock Galleries, Daniel Fraad, Hirschl & Adler, Paul Magriel, Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., Victor Spark, and others.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Art Collection Files, 1943-2007 (Boxes 1-3; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Artwork, Sold or Donated, 1903, 1950-2003 (Boxes 3-5; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 3: Accession Records, 1959-circa 1994 (Box 5; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Catalog Information, circa 1960-1967 (Box 5; 3 Folders)
Biographical / Historical:
Raymond Horowitz (1916-2005), a lifelong resident of New York City, was a founding partner in the firm Graubard Miller, where he practiced corporate law for over fifty years. Horowitz's interest in art history and art developed as an undergraduate student at Columbia College (1932-1936) where he attended lectures by the art historian, Meyer Schapiro. In 1939, Horowitz earned his jurisprudence degree from Columbia University. Shortly thereafter, he found a position as assistant Corporation Counsel of the City of New York, where he remained until 1943 when he went into private practice. In 1940, Raymond married Margaret Goldenberg.

Raymond and Margaret shared an interest in art and began collecting in the 1940s. Initially, the Horowitzes acquired drawings and pastels on a modest, informal basis. In 1961, with the purchase of a painting by Robert Henri, Raymond and Margaret began to collect early twentieth century American artists, whose work they thought had been overshadowed by the French Impressionists and the Abstract Expressionists. Raymond and Margaret Horowitz were credited as pioneers in the rediscovery and revaluation of the work of Frank Benson, William Merritt Chase, Childe Hassam, Maurice Prendergast, Theodore Robinson, John H. Twachtman, J. Alden Weir and other notable American Impressionist artists. Raymond Horowitz also acquired the works of Social Realist artists, such as Thomas Anshutz, George Bellows, William Glackens, and John Sloan. Many of the pieces from the Horowitzes' collection have been exhibited in museums and galleries in the United States and abroad. Raymond and Margaret Horowitz donated works of art to the Brooklyn Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Newark Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art; in early 2000s, they made a major gift of 49 paintings, drawings, and watercolors to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

In September, 2005, at the age of 90 years, Raymond Horowitz died in New York.

Born in New York City in 1915, Margaret Horowitz (1915-2005) received a Bachelor of Arts degree from New York University. Encouraged by her parents to equip herself to earn a living, Margaret went on to receive a Master's Degree from Teacher's College at Fordham University in literature. Raymond Horowitz referred to Margaret as an equal partner in their collecting endeavors. At the time of her death in March, 2005, Margaret and Raymond had been married for sixty-five years.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are two oral history interviews with Raymond Horowitz, conducted 1973 January 17 by Paul Cummings and conducted 2004 October 20-November 5 by Avis Berman.
Provenance:
The papers of Raymond and Margaret Horowitz were donated in 2015 by Stephen L. Ingerman, the executor of the estate of Raymond and Margaret Horowitz.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Raymond and Margaret Horowitz papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Impressionism (Art)  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Raymond and Margaret Horowitz papers, 1903-2007, bulk 1960-2007. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hororaym
See more items in:
Raymond and Margaret Horowitz papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hororaym
Additional Online Media:

Lockwood de Forest papers

Creator:
De Forest, Lockwood, 1850-1932  Search this
Names:
Heckscher Museum  Search this
Santa Barbara Museum of Art  Search this
Culin, Stewart, 1858-1929  Search this
De Forest, Robert W., 1848-1931 ((Robert Weeks))  Search this
Kemble, Meta  Search this
Korzybski, Alfred, 1879-1950  Search this
Lewis, Anne  Search this
Extent:
3.8 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Drawings
Diaries
Place:
India -- description and travel
Date:
1858-1980
bulk 1870-1930
Summary:
The papers of New York and California based interior designer, architect, collector and painter Lockwood de Forest measure 3.8 linear feet and date from 1858 to 1980, bulk dates 1870 to 1930. The collection includes correspondence, writings, diaries, journals, exhibition files, personal business records, printed material, sketchbooks, drawings, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York and California based interior designer, architect, collector and painter Lockwood de Forest measure 3.8 linear feet and date from 1858 to 1980, bulk dates 1870 to 1930. The collection includes correspondence, writings, diaries, journals, exhibition files, personal business records, printed material, sketchbooks, drawings, and photographs.

Lockwood de Forest's professional correspondence includes letters regarding de Forest's wood carving business in India. Notable correspondents from friends and colleagues include Stewart Culin, Alfred Korzybski, and Purushottam M. Hutheesing & Sons. Also included are two letter books which contain copies of letters written by de Forest. There is a fair amount of correspondence with family members, especially de Forest's parents, his brother Robert, and his wife Meta Kemble. There are also a few folders of Meta Kemble de Forest's correspondence with family.

Writings include drafts of Lockwood de Forest's book Indian Domestic Architecture, along with essays and notes. Essays by de Forest are on assorted topics such as art, education, museums, furniture construction, and psychic research. There is also a draft of a Lockwood de Forest biography by Anne Lewis.

Diaries and journals kept by Lockwood de Forest and his wife Meta focus on travels abroad to Europe, the Middle East, and India.

Exhibition files consist of materials related to a Lockwood de Forest exhibition (1976) at the Heckscher Museum in New York and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art in California. Documentation includes correspondence, exhibition lists, inventories, and loan forms.

Personal business records include a wide range of financial and legal records. Financial records consist of ledgers, account records, receipts, invoices, and shipping records. Legal records include contracts, certificates, and deeds related to assets, properties, and businesses.

Printed material consists of exhibition catalogs, auction catalogs, magazines, books, announcements, event invitations, and clippings. Most of the material is about Lockwood de Forest, but there are some clippings and publications about his brother Robert and other subjects.

There are numerous sketchbooks usually depicting places de Forest visited in Europe and the Middle East. There are also a few loose drawings.

Photographs are of Lockwood de Forest, his wife, family, friends, colleagues, paintings, houses, wood carvings, and art objects.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1858-1931 (0.9 linear feet; Boxes 1, 4)

Series 2: Writings, 1881-1976 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, OV 5)

Series 3: Diaries and Journals, 1868-1890 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 4: Lockwood de Forest Exhibition Files, 1974-1978 (0.1 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1869-1931 (0.3 linear feet; Box 2, OV 6)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1867-1980 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 2-3)

Series 7: Sketchbooks and Drawings, 1869-1881 (0.4 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1870-circa 1932 (0.2 linear feet; Box 3)
Biographical / Historical:
Lockwood de Forest (1850-1932) was an architect, interior designer, collector, landscape painter, and writer based in New York City and Santa Barbara, California.

Lockwood de Forest was born in New York City in 1850. His parents were Julia Weeks and Henry Grant de Forest. He was one of four children. In 1869, he went to Rome, Italy and began studying art under the tutelage of the American painter Frederic Edwin Church whom he met during his trip. Church continued to be de Forest's mentor after they returned to America. De Forest set up a studio in New York City and first exhibited his work in 1872. From 1875-1878, he went on two more trips abroad to Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.

In 1878, de Forest cofounded Associated Artists in New York along with Louis C. Tiffany, Candace Wheeler, and Samuel Coleman. The design firm closed around 1882 but was tremendously influential. He married Meta Kemble the same year that he began Associated Artists and the couple traveled to India where they stayed for the next two years. During that trip, de Forest met philanthropist Muggunbhai Hutheesing and together they established a woodcarving company and supplied Associated Artists with furniture and architectural objects.

Around 1882, De Forest opened his own business in New York City that managed the design and production of furniture and architectural accents, along with importing similar objects from India. In 1887, he purchased a house on 7 East 10th Street that he elaborately decorated with furnishings from India.

De Forest began spending winters in Santa Barbara, California starting in 1889. He eventually purchased a house and relocated there around 1922. While in California, he resumed painting with fervor and created many landscapes of the West Coast shorelines. De Forest died in Santa Barbara in 1932.
Provenance:
The Lockwood de Forest papers were donated in 1982 by Mrs. Lockwood de Forest III, daughter-in-law of Lockwood de Forest.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Lockwood de Forest papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Architects -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Interior decorators -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Painters -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Topic:
Architects -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Interior decorators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Drawings
Diaries
Citation:
Lockwood de Forest papers, 1858-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.defolock
See more items in:
Lockwood de Forest papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-defolock
Additional Online Media:

The Zorach Family papers

Creator:
Zorach Family  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Brooklyn Museum  Search this
Adams, Ansel, 1902-1984  Search this
Cunningham, Imogen, 1883-1976  Search this
Ipcar, Dahlov Zorach, 1917-  Search this
Newman, Arnold, 1918-2006  Search this
Partridge, Roi, 1888-1984  Search this
Zorach, Marguerite, 1887-1968  Search this
Zorach, Tessim  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
4.4 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Prints
Articles
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Notes
Writings
Date:
1900-1987
Summary:
The Zorach Family papers measure 4.4 linear feet and consist of materials relating to the lives and careers of sculptor and painter William Zorach, his wife painter and weaver Marguerite, and their children, painter and multi-media artist Dahlov Ipcar and collector and art dealer Tessim Zorach. The bulk of the papers consists of letters to Tessim regarding his parent's artwork. Additional materials include scattered letters to William Zorach; writings and notes by William, Marguerite, and Tessim; a sketchbook and drawings by William; prints by Marguerite; Marguerite's scrapbook; printed materials; and photographs of the Zorach family and of William Zorach in his studio and at work.
Scope and Content Note:
The Zorach Family papers measure 4.4 linear feet and consist of materials relating to the lives and careers of sculptor and painter William Zorach, his wife painter and weaver Marguerite, and their children, painter and multi-media artist Dahlov Ipcar and collector and art dealer Tessim Zorach. The bulk of the papers consists of letters to Tessim regarding his parent's artwork. Additional materials include scattered letters to William Zorach; writings and notes by William, Marguerite, and Tessim; a sketchbook and drawings by William; prints by Marguerite; Marguerite's scrapbook; printed materials; and photographs of the Zorach family and of William Zorach in his studio and at work.

The majority of correspondence is between Tessim Zorach and various museums and galleries concerning exhibitions and donations of his parents' works of art. There are scattered letters to William Zorach among the correspondence. Business records consist of materials relating to the Collection of the Zorach Children, including lists of works of art by the Zorach's, a file relating to an exhibition of Zorach artwork at the Brooklyn Museum, and photographs of works of art considered for donation.

Writings and Notes include a typescript of an article written by Marguerite Zorach, writings by William Zorach, a typescript of Young Poems by William and Marguerite, as well as articles written by others about the Zorachs. Artwork by Marguerite Zorach includes two prints and a tracing. Also found is one sketchbook, and additional drawings by William Zorach. There is one unsigned lithograph.

The majority of exhibition announcements, catalogs, and clippings concern William and Marguerite Zorach although there are two announcements for Dahlov Ipcar. There is one scrapbook of clippings about Marguerite.

The papers include photographs of Marguerite and William Zorach, their parents, baby photos of Tessim and Dahlov, family pictures of the Zorachs, and of Marguerite and William in their studios. There are several folders of William Zorach working in his studios and additional photos of him carving a relief sculpture and a sculpture for the Southwest Bank. Most of these photographs contain detailed annotations written by William Zorach about the work. There is one folder of photographs of William in France in 1910-1911, including one of Zorach in Roi Partridge's studio. There is one photograph of Zorach taken by Ansel Adams in Yosemite, a photo of Zorach working by Arnold Newman, and several taken by Imogen Cunnigham.

Other photographs are of works of art, most of which depict William's works.

Artifacts include Marguerite's batik tools and approximately fifty commercially made printing blocks.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Information, circa 1907-1969 (Box 1, 6; 3 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1922-1982 (Box 1-2; 1.75 linear feet)

Series 3: Business Records, 1967-1971, circa 1960s-1970s (Box 2-3; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings and Notes, circa 1930s-1973, 1987 (Box 3; 8 folders)

Series 5: Artworks, 1900-circa 1920s (Box 3, 6; 12 folders)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1922-1953 (Box 3; 1 folder)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1912-1982 (Box 3; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1908-1966 (Box 3-5; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Artifacts, circa 1910s, circa 1950s (Box 4; 0.5 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
William Zorach (1887-1966) was a modernist painter and sculptor working primarily in New York city, along with his wife Marguerite (1887-1968) who worked as a fauvist painter, printmaker, and textile artist. Their children were painter Dahlov Ipcar (1917-) and art collector Tessim Zorach (1915-1995.)

Born in Lithuania, William Zorach immigrated to the United States where his family settled in Cleveland, Ohio. An early interest in art led to a printmaking apprenticeship. He then moved to New York City and enrolled in the National Academy of Design where he studied painting and drawing. In 1910, Zorach traveled to Paris to study and where he met his wife Marguerite Thompson at the La Palette art school. Marguerite grew up in Fresno, California and studied art at Stanford University. Both artists were heavily influenced by the fauvist and cubist art movements.

Returning to America, Marguerite and William married and both continued to create and experiment with varied media. Their paintings were featured in the 1913 New York City Armory Show and they are credited with being among the first artists to introduce European modernist styles to American modernism. The Zorachs were very close both as a couple and as working active artists.

In the 1920s, Marguerite began to experiment with textiles and created large, fine art tapestries and hooked rugs. Also, she used batik dying techniques on fabrics. William also expanded his genre by creating direct sculpture in 1918, which would become his primary medium.

In 1915, William and Marguerite started a family with their son, Tessim. Two years later, their daughter Dahlov was born. The Zorachs divided the year and lived in New York City, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. In 1923, the family bought a farm on Georgetown Island, Maine where they lived, worked, and entertained friends.

Dahlov and Tessim were exposed to art from an early age. Dahlov showed artistic promise as a child and her parents supported her creativity by allowing her to express herself without formal training. Dahlov pursued painting and later became an illustrator for children's books. Additionally, she wrote fantasy novels and short stories. Dahlov married Adolf Ipcar in 1936. Like the rest of his family, Tessim Zorach developed an interest of art and along with his wife Peggy, he amassed a large private collection of ancient to modern art.

William and Marguerite continued to sculpt and paint until their deaths in 1966 and 1968, respectively.

Together, Dahlov and Tessim established the Collection of the Zorach Children which coordinated donations of their parents' art to many museums throughout the United States and the world. The artwork of both artists is found in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, Delaware Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Farnsworth Art Museum, Portland Museum of Art, National Gallery of Art, National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, The Philips Collection, and educational institutions such as Colby College, University of Vermont, Williams College, Bowdoin College, and the University of Virginia. In addition William has works associated with many public buildings, among them: Radio City Music Hall, New York City Municipal Court, the U.S. Post Office in Washington D.C. as well as Farleigh Dickinson University.
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art holds the Dahlov Ipcar papers, 1906-1997. Also found is one oral history interview with William Zorach conducted by by John D. Morse on April 2, 1959 and an oral history interview with Dahlov Ipcar conducted by Robert F. Brown on November 13, 1979.

The bulk of William Zorach's papers are held by the Library of Congress.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming on reels NY59-1-NY59-4 and NY59-19. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are now held by the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division. This material is not described in the collection container inventory or finding aid.
Provenance:
William Zorach lent papers for microfilming to the Archives of American Art in 1959. Tessim Zorach donated materials between 1976-1987.
Restrictions:
Use of originals requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Zorach Family papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artist couples  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Weavers  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Prints
Articles
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Notes
Writings
Citation:
The Zorach Family papers, 1900-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.zorazora
See more items in:
The Zorach Family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zorazora

Francis Patrick Garvan papers

Creator:
Garvan, Mabel Brady  Search this
Garvan, Francis Patrick, 1875-1937  Search this
Names:
American Art Association  Search this
Garvan Collection (Yale University)  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
O'Reilly's Plaza Art Galleries  Search this
Parke-Bernet Galleries  Search this
Yale University -- Art collections  Search this
Bigelow, Francis Hill, 1859-1933  Search this
Day, George Parmly, 1876-1959  Search this
Ensko, Robert  Search this
Halsey, R. T. Haines (Richard Townley Haines), 1865-1942  Search this
Jones, E. Alfred (Edward Alfred), 1872-1943  Search this
Keough, Andrew, 1869-1953  Search this
Kimball, Fiske, 1888-1955  Search this
Nutting, Wallace, 1861-1941  Search this
Phillips, John Marshall, 1905-1953  Search this
Extent:
44.9 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Date:
1912-1953
1867
Summary:
The papers of art collector Francis Patrick Garvan measure 44.9 linear feet and date from 1912 to 1953, with one document from 1867. The papers provide extensive documentation on the Garvan collection which included rare books, ceramics, glass, paintings, prints, and furniture. The majority of the collection consists of inventory records that give descriptive information regarding each piece in the collection; in many cases the files also include a photograph of the object. Also found are correspondence and subject files; auction records for sales at the American Art Association, Parke-Bernet Galleries, and Plaza Art Galleries; loan records; estate records; and a small amount of printed material, writings, and photographs. Approximately half of the Garvan papers were created posthumously by Mabel Brady Garvan and the managers of Garvan's estate.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art collector Francis Patrick Garvan measure 44.9 linear feet and date from 1912 to 1953, with one document from 1867. The papers provide extensive documentation on the Garvan collection which included rare books, ceramics, glass, paintings, prints, and furniture. The majority of the collection consists of inventory records that give descriptive information regarding each piece in the collection; in many cases the files also include a photograph of the object. Also found are correspondence and subject files; auction records for sales at the American Art Association, Parke-Bernet Galleries, and Plaza Art Galleries; loan records; estate records; and a small amount of printed material, writings, and photographs. Approximately half of the Garvan papers were created posthumously by Mabel Brady Garvan and the managers of Garvan's estate.

Notable correspondence is with antique, art and rare book dealers, museums, curators, conservators, Garvan's employees, George Parmly Day, Andrew Keough, and John Marshall Phillips of Yale University regarding the 1930 gift of the [Mabel Brady] Garvan Collection to Yale, as well as the American Art Association, Anderson Galleries, Inc., Francis Bigelow, Robert Ensko, Richard T. Haines Halsey, E. Alfred Jones, Fiske Kimball, William Macbeth, Inc., Wallace Nutting, Richard W. Symonds, and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Correspondence and Subject Files, 1912-1942, 1953 (11.5 linear feet; Boxes 1-12, 46)

Series 2: Auction Records, circa 1930s-1949 (1.75 linear feet; Boxes 12-13)

Series 3: Loan Records, 1919-1948 (3.0 linear feet; Boxes 14-16, 46)

Series 4: Estate Records, 1929-1951 (0.75 linear feet; Box 17, 45)

Series 5: Inventory, 1928-1949 (26.0 linear feet; Boxes 17-43)

Series 6: Printed Materials, 1867, 1926-1949 (1.0 linear foot; Boxes 43-44, 46)

Series 7: Writings, 1930s (0.3 linear feet; Box 44)

Series 8: Photographic Materials, 1930s-1940s (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 44-45, 47)
Biographical / Historical:
Francis Patrick Garvan (1875-1937) and his wife Mabel Brady Garvan were art collectors in the 1920s and 1930s, specializing in decorative arts and furniture. Professionally, Garvan was a lawyer who spent the majority of his career serving as President of the Chemical Foundation, to which he was appointed by President Woodrow Wilson. He maintained relationships with many prominent museums and galleries including the American Art Association, the Anderson Galleries, the Brooklyn Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Over the course of his life, Garvan had amassed a collection of thousands of decorative and fine art objects. During his final years, Garvan arranged for the majority of his art collection to be donated to Yale University, his alma mater.
Provenance:
Donated 1981 by Anthony N. B. Garvan and Phil Hoyt for the estate of Mabel Brady Garvan.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Francis Patrick Garvan papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Decorative arts -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Francis Patrick Garvan papers, 1867, 1912-1953. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.garvfran
See more items in:
Francis Patrick Garvan papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-garvfran
Additional Online Media:

Robert Scull papers

Creator:
Scull, Robert, 1917-1986  Search this
Names:
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976 -- Photographs  Search this
De Maria, Walter, 1935-2013  Search this
Di Suvero, Mark, 1933-  Search this
Heizer, Michael, 1944-  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Kuehn, Gary, 1939- -- Photographs  Search this
Oldenburg, Claes, 1929- -- Photographs  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Samaras, Lucas, 1936-  Search this
Tweddle, John  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-  Search this
Extent:
2 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
1955-circa 1984
bulk 1965-1970
Summary:
The Robert Scull papers measure 2 linear feet and date from 1955 to circa 1984, with the bulk of the material dating from 1965 to 1970. Throughout the 1960s, Robert Scull was a wealthy and prominent art collector of Abstract, Pop, and Minimalist art whose collection included works by Michael Heizer, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Andy Warhol, among others. HIs papers include fourteen annotated appointment books, correspondence, financial and legal records, printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The Robert Scull papers measure 2 linear feet and date from 1955 to circa 1984, with the bulk of the material dating from 1965 to 1970. Throughout the 1960s, Robert Scull was a wealthy and prominent art collector of Abstract, Pop, and Minimalist art whose collection included works by Michael Heizer, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Andy Warhol, among others. HIs papers include fourteen annotated appointment books, correspondence, financial and legal records, printed material, and photographs.

Fourteen appointment books include business dates, notes, and occasional sketches. Notes are on various subjects such as prices for paintings, appointments with art dealers, and visits with artists Mark di Suvero, Michael Heizer, Lucas Samaras, and others. There are sometimes items, i.e., business cards and receipts, interleaved between the pages of the books.

The bulk of the correspondence consists of letters to Robert Scull from various artists, such as Walter De Maria and Michael Heizer. There is limited correspondence with museums and galleries.

Financial and legal records mostly consist of invoices from art dealers to Robert Scull for his purchases of John Tweddle's artwork. Also included are art loan forms and charts tracking payments for various paintings and drawings. There are scattered legal papers on a settlement regarding payments for a group of paintings by Tweddle.

There is one exhibition catalog, Street Painters: Feelism (circa 1982), of printed material.

Photographs are of Robert Scull, friends, art dealers, artists, and art. Notable artists depicted include Alexander Calder, Gary Kuehn, Claes Oldenberg, Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol, and many others. There are also images of sculptures, paintings, and other artwork by various artists.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 5 series.

Series 1: Appointment Books, 1955-1973 (1.5 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1965-circa 1984 (0.2 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 3: Financial and Legal Records, 1969-1980 (0.1 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 4: Printed Material, circa 1982 (1 folder; Box 3)

Series 5: Photographs, 1960-circa 1980 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 3-4)
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Scull (1917-1986) was a prominent New York City and Connecticut collector of contemporary American art primarily during the 1960s.

Robert Scull was born in Manhattan's Lower East Side. He dropped out of high school during the Depression and did various jobs while also taking art courses. He later became a freelance illustrator and industrial designer. When his wife Ethel's father died, the couple inherited a successful taxi business which Scull expanded into the Super Operating Corporation with a fleet of 130 cabs.

Throughout the 1960s, Robert and Ethel Scull were avid art collectors who acquired contemporary American art works through dealers Richard Bellamy and Leo Castelli. Robert Scull's patronage also helped fund art dealer Richard Bellamy's Green Gallery in New York City for five years. Initially the Sculls focused on collecting American Abstract Expressionists and owned works by Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and others. In 1965, the couple held their first auction and part of the profits helped establish the Robert and Ethel Scull Foundation, dedicated to financially assisting upcoming artists. The foundation commissioned environmental works from Michael Heizer and Walter de Maria and gave the artists stipends and even bought them food and supplies.

Around the mid-1960s, the Sculls also began collecting Pop Art and acquired the works of Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, and Andy Warhol. In 1973, the couple sold 50 works from their personal collection of Pop Art through a Sotheby's auction that yielded $2.2 million - record-breaking for sales of contemporary American art. The Sculls were criticized of social-climbing and profiteering by various people in the media and art world, including the artist Robert Rauschenberg.

In 1975, Robert Scull divorced Ethel and in 1978 he founded the Robert C. Scull Foundation which again assisted younger artists and arts organizations with a focus on contemporary art. Scull remarried and sold his taxi business sometime in the early 1980s, and moved to Warren, Connecticut. He died in 1986.

In 2010, the exhibition Robert and Ethel Scull: Portrait of a Collection was held at Acquavella Galleries in Manhattan.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also has an oral history interview with Robert Scull conducted by Paul Cummings in 1972.
Provenance:
The 14 appointment books in the collection were donated in 1999 by Amy Newman, a writer, who received them from her friend, artist Chuck Close. Close received them from his brother-in-law, who found them in the trash, turned them over to Close, who, in turn, gave them to Newman.

The rest of the papers were donated in 1993 by Robert Scull's widow, Stephanie.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Robert Scull papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Connecticut  Search this
Pop art  Search this
Art, Abstract  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Robert Scull papers, 1955-circa 1984, bulk dates 1965-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sculrobe
See more items in:
Robert Scull papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sculrobe
Additional Online Media:

Douglas Cramer papers

Creator:
Cramer, Douglas S.  Search this
Names:
Boone, Mary  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Kelly, Ellsworth, 1923-  Search this
Ruscha, Edward  Search this
Extent:
1.3 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Visitors' books
Photographs
Date:
circa 1970-2014
Summary:
The papers of New York art collector Douglas Cramer measure 1.3 linear feet and date from circa 1970-2014. Papers include letters from artists, four guest books signed by visitors to Cramer's art collection and attendees of his parties, printed material documenting Cramer's career in television as well as his prominence as an art collector, and photographs of people and artists who attended his parties including Ellsworth Kelly, Ed Ruscha, Mary Boone, Leo Castelli, and others.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York art collector Douglas Cramer measure 1.3 linear feet and date from circa 1970-2014. Papers include letters from artists, four guest books signed by visitors to Cramer's art collection and attendees of his parties, printed material documenting Cramer's career in television as well as his prominence as an art collector, and photographs of people and artists who attended his parties including Ellsworth Kelly, Ed Ruscha, Mary Boone, Leo Castelli, and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as four series

Series 1: Letters, 1972-2014 (2 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Guest Books, 1990-1997 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 3: Printed Material, circa 1972-2012 (0.7 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Photographs, circa 1970, circa 1985 (1 folder; Box 1)
Biographical / Historical:
Douglas Cramer (1931- ) is an art collector and television producer in New York, New York and Miami, Florida. A producer of noted television series including The Love Boat, Dynasty, and The Brady Bunch, Cramer is also an avid art collector and was a founding member of the Board of Trustees of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Douglas Cramer conducted by Avis Berman in 2013.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives of American Art in 2016 by Douglas S. Cramer.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Douglas Cramer papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Television producers and directors -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Television producers and directors -- New York -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Visitors' books
Photographs
Citation:
Douglas Cramer papers, circa 1970-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cramdoug
See more items in:
Douglas Cramer papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cramdoug

Jock Truman papers

Creator:
Truman, Jock, 1920-  Search this
Names:
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Truman Gallery  Search this
Green, Eric  Search this
Extent:
4 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Date:
1852-2011
Summary:
The papers of gallery director and art collector Jock Truman measure 4.0 linear feet and date from 1852 to 2011. Found within the collection are biographical material; correspondence with friends, family, artists, and others; records of the short-lived Truman Gallery; a few writings by Truman; printed material; artwork by Truman and others; and photographs of Truman, his partner Eric Green, friends, family, and the Truman-Green collection of artwork. A small amount of material documents his work at the Betty Parsons Gallery.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of gallery director and art collector Jock Truman measure 4.0 linear feet and date from 1852 to 2011. Found within the collection are biographical material; correspondence with friends, family, artists, and others; records of the short-lived Truman Gallery; a few writings by Truman; printed material; artwork by Truman and others; and photographs of Truman, his partner Eric Green, friends, family, and the Truman-Green collection of artwork. A small amount of material documents his work at the Betty Parsons Gallery.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1914-2006 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1929-2011 (0.6 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Truman Gallery Records, 1975-1979 (9 folders; Boxes 2, 6)

Series 4: Writings, circa 1970s-2005 (1 folder; Box 2)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1852, 1940s-2010 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 2, 6, OV 7)

Series 6: Artwork, 1860-1995 (0.3 linear feet; Boxes 2, 6, OV 7)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1860s-2009 (1.9 linear feet; Boxes 2-6, OV 7)
Biographical / Historical:
Jock Truman (1920-2011) was an art collector, dealer, and gallery owner in New York, New York. Truman was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the son of Curtis Truman and Athelyn Amundsen Truman. He attended the University of Cincinnati from 1938 to 1941 and served in the U.S. Armed Forces in Brazil from 1942 to 1946. From 1946 to 1950 he attended the Harvard Graduate School of Design where he studied with Josef Albers, Gyorgy Kepes, and Hyman Bloom. During the 1950s he owned Thirty-Five River St. Inc., a Boston firm specializing in architectural and interior design.

Truman worked at Robert Isaacson Gallery for four years before moving to Betty Parsons Gallery, where he worked from 1961 to 1974. There he gained specialist knowledge regarding the work of Ad Reinhardt and assisted Reinhardt's widow in the evaluation of artworks after the artist's death. In 1974 he served as director of Parsons Gallery and he and Betty Parsons opened the Parsons-Truman Gallery, which operated as a joint venture from 1975 to 1976. In 1976 he opened Truman Gallery at 38 East 57th St. The gallery closed in 1979.

In 1989 Truman and his companion of over 30 years, Eric Green, moved to Miami. Truman and Green had a large collection of art which they donated to various museums including the Bass Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art in North Miami.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 1982 and 2005-2006 by Jock Truman and 2011 by Truman via Eric Kane, Executor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to Archives' Washington D.C. center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Jock Truman papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Gallery directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Jock Truman papers, 1852-2011. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.trumjock
See more items in:
Jock Truman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-trumjock

Rita and Daniel Fraad papers

Creator:
Fraad, Rita  Search this
Names:
Fraad, Daniel  Search this
Extent:
3.3 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Date:
1926-1997
Summary:
The papers of art collectors Rita and Daniel Fraad measure 3.3 linear feet and date from 1926 to 1997. The collection consists of art documentation files that reflect their American art collecting activities. Found in the files are any combination of the following materials: correspondence, sales receipts, treatment reports and photographs, loan agreements, facilities reports, exhibition and auction catalogs, clippings, photographs, transparencies, and slides.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of art collectors Rita and Daniel Fraad measure 3.3 linear feet and date from 1926 to 1997. The collection consists of art documentation files that reflect their American art collecting activities. Found in the files are any combination of the following materials: correspondence, sales receipts, treatment reports and photographs, loan agreements, facilities reports, exhibition and auction catalogs, clippings, photographs, transparencies, and slides.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 1 series:

Series 1: Artwork Documentation Files, 1926-1997, undated (Boxes 1-4; 3.3 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Rita (1915-2004) and Daniel Fraad (1912-1987) were American art collectors in New York, New York.

Rita (née Ritch) and Daniel Fraad were born in Brooklyn, New York, and met in their youth. Daniel graduated in 1935 from Brown University with a B.A. in biology and Rita graduated from Smith College in 1937 with a degree in political science. In 1938, Daniel joined Allied Maintenance Corporation (later Ogden Maintenance Corporation), a maintenance and cleaning services company started by his father in 1888. In the same year that Daniel joined the family business, Rita and Daniel were married. The couple eventually settled in Scarsdale, New York.

Rita and Daniel Fraad actively supported art institutions such as the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Academy of Design, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, among others. In 1965, the couple became members of the Archives of American Art and in 1989 Rita joined the Board of Trustees. She also sat on the Visiting Committee on American Art and Sculpture for the Metropolitan Museum of Art and was a member of the American Art Forum of the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM). Rita was a SAAM commissioner for twelve years, and served as chair of the Collections Committee.

Over the years, Rita and Daniel Fraad amassed a museum-quality collection of American art which included works from George Bellows, William Merritt Chase, Thomas Cole, Jasper Cropsey, Arthur Davies, Charles Demuth, Marsden Hartley, Robert Henri, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, John Singer Sargent, Everett Shinn, John Sloan, Joseph Stella, and James Whistler. In 1964, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York, organized an exhibition of the Fraad collection which traveled to the Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. In 1985, the Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas also presented an exhibition of the Fraad collection.

Daniel Fraad died in 1987 and Rita passed away in 2004. In December 2004, the Fraad collection was auctioned at Sotheby's and raised over sixty five million dollars. The sale broke auction records; the amount was the highest total for any single owner's collection.
Provenance:
The papers were donated in 2005 by Rita and Daniel Fraad via Jurate Nemickas, Fiduciary Administrator for the estate of Rita and Daniel Fraad.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.
Rights:
The Rita and Daniel Fraad papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Rita and Daniel Fraad papers, 1926-1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.fraarita
See more items in:
Rita and Daniel Fraad papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fraarita

Donald Blinken papers

Creator:
Blinken, Donald M., 1925-  Search this
Names:
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Vicente, Esteban, 1903-2001  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1956-2011
Summary:
The papers of art collector and former United States Ambassador Donald Blinken measure .4 linear feet and date from 1956-2011. The collection is comprised of correspondence and printed material regarding several of the artists Blinken collected, including Willem de Kooning, Philip Guston, and Esteban Vicente.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art collector and former United States Ambassador Donald Blinken measure .4 linear feet and date from 1956-2011. The collection is comprised of correspondence and printed material regarding several of the artists Blinken collected, including Willem de Kooning, Philip Guston, and Esteban Vicente.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as two series

Series 1: Correspondence, 1956-2011 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Printed Material, 1974-2008 (0.1 linear foot; Box 1)
Biographical / Historical:
Donald Blinken (1925- ) is an art collector in New York City and served as United States Ambassador to Hungary from 1994-1997. Throughout his career, Blinken has held leadership roles in investment banking, education, and arts patronage.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives of American Art by Donald Blinken in 2014.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Donald Blinken papers, 1956-2011 are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Citation:
Donald Blinken papers, 1956-2011. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.blindona
See more items in:
Donald Blinken papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-blindona

Modify Your Search






or


Narrow By
  • Archives of American Art